Daily Archives: April 21, 2016

Throwback Thursday-Coneheads (1993)

In it’s over 40 years on television, Saturday Night Live has introduced audiences to its fare share of memorable characters and skits.

One of the earliest skits were the Coneheads, aliens with pointy heads who claim to come from France.

In 1993, the Coneheads made it to the big screen. Reprising their small screen roles were Dan Aykroyd as Beldar, Jane Curtin and Prymatt. Instead of Laraine Newman, who played Connie on television, Michelle Burke was cast as the film Connie.  The plot of the film revolves around the Conehead’s plan to conquer Earth. It seems simple, until they have a child and the government is keeping a close watch on this very interesting family.

One of the earliest films that was based on a Saturday Night Live skit, it hold’s true to its television roots. To me at least, there is also a universality of being an immigrant (which is what the Coneheads are) and reacting a child who is being raised in another culture.

Do I recommend it? Yes.

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Filed under Movie Review, Movies, Television, Throwback Thursday

Passover

Tomorrow night begins the Jewish holiday of Passover.

Most people who have some knowledge of Passover and the story of Moses.

Moses is born to Jewish slaves at a time in history when the Jewish people are enslaved in Egypt. Pharaoh is told of a prophecy that states that a newborn son of a Jewish slave will be his downfall. His soldiers are sent to kill every newborn son within the slave community to prevent this young man from reaching his destiny.

Tradition tells us that in an effort to save her son, Moses’s mother Yochoved, put her son in a basket and sets the basket adrift on the Nile. The basket is found by the Egyptian princess who takes Moses in and raises him as her own. Moses’s older sister Miriam, having followed the basket, offers the princess the services of a wet-nurse. That wet-nurse is Yochoved.

Moses grows up as a prince of Egypt. He believes that his destiny is set. But when he kills an overseer who is beating a slave nearly to death, he runs from Egypt in fear. This is the beginning of the Passover story and Moses’s journey to the man he is destined to become.

I am not that observant in my faith as some are. Like many adults, I was raised in an observant Jewish home, but I have chosen to be a little more lax in my religious observance. But there are certain traditions that I will always observe and Passover is one of them.

As a modern woman and a feminist, one of my favorite aspects of this story is the strong women who will, in each their own way, help Moses to reach his destiny. Whether it is his mother, who makes the ultimate parental sacrifice, the Egyptian princess he calls mother or his elder sister Miriam who is not going to sit idly by the wayside, this story, unlike many biblical stories have fully fleshed out, strong, capable and intelligent women. I am proud to be descended from these women.

The other aspect of this story that never fails to amaze me is the presence of hope. When all seems lost and the darkness is encroaching, sometimes all you need to pick yourself up and move forward is that little nugget of hope.

Happy Passover.

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Filed under Feminism, History, Life, Movies

Throwback Thursday: Harriet The Spy (1996)

Imagination, as amazing as it is, can sometimes be overblown.

In the classic children’s novel, Harriet The Spy by Louise Fitzhugh is the story of a young girl, Harriet M. Welch, who fancies herself to be a spy. When her friends find her notebook, Harriet’s spying days seem to be over. Can Harriet continue with her spying and regain the friendships she has lost?

In 1996, the book was made into a film starring Michelle Trachtenberg and Rosie O’Donnell.

Remaining true to the book, the film is charming, funny and has enough humor to keep both young and young at heart audiences entertained.

Do I recommend it? Yes.

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Filed under Books, Movie Review, Movies, New York City, Throwback Thursday

Notable Birthdays

Today, April 21st is the birthday of two important and very notable women who proved and continue to prove that women are far more capable than some think they are.

Charlotte Bronte was born 200 years ago today.

Her early years could have not, by any stretch of the imagination, predicted her success as a writer during her adult years.

The third child of Patrick and Maria Bronte, Charlotte tragically became the oldest child after her two older sisters, Maria and Elizabeth died of childhood disease.   After Mrs. Bronte died soon after the birth of her youngest child, Patrick Bronte raised his children with the help of his sister-in-law.

As an adult, Charlotte Bronte was her father’s daughter. An early feminist and a great reader, Bronte’s most famous novel Jane Eyre is the story of an orphaned young woman who overcomes all of the barriers that Victorian society placed before her to find happiness.

Today is also the 90th birthday of Queen Elizabeth II.

Sitting on the throne since the late 1940’s, she has surpassed her great-great- grandmother, Queen Victoria as the world’s longest reigning monarch.

Taking the throne in an era when women were told that their lives were best spent as wives and mothers, she proved that a woman is capable to maintaining a career while living the traditional life of a wife and mother.

Happy Birthday.

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Filed under Books, Charlotte Bronte, Feminism, History, Jane Eyre, Writing

RIP Prince

Prince passed away today.

For many artists, Prince is an icon. He had the unique ability to mingle multiple genres into songs that are catchy, dance-able, singable, and unforgettable. He was also an actor starring in the 1984 movie Purple Rain.

I could choose any number of songs to remember him by, but I submit to you his legacy: his songs have no boundaries.

I present to you Maroon 5 doing a cover of Kiss.

RIP Prince.

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Filed under Movies, Music