The Dark Lady’s Mask Book Review

With every successful writer, there are questions of where they got their initial plot ideas from and whom they encountered as they developed the plot and the characters. When it comes to William Shakespeare, there are myths that he might have not written some of the work that we identify him with.

One of the myths is that Aemilia Lanier (nee Bassano) had a hand in writing some of Shakespeare’s most famous works.

Mary Sharratt’s new book, The Dark Lady’s Mask, shows us the world of Elizabethan England through Aemilia’s eyes. For her time, Aemilia was unusual. Educated, smart and not averse to cross dressing when needed, we first meet Aemilia when she is a young girl. Her father is Marrano Jew who escaped Italy and the Inquisition as a young man. While he publicly lives the life of a good Christian, he has never forgotten his faith. Her mother, who found herself abandoned and pregnant by her first husband, married Aemilia’s father and raised her daughters as if they were full blood sisters.

Aemilia’s life is one dramatic turn after the other. After the death of her father, she is taken away to be educated. In her teens, Aemilia becomes the mistress of one of the most powerful men in England, who is old enough to be her father several times over. Finding herself pregnant by her lover, she is married off to Alfonse Lanier. Then she meets William Shakespeare and that is where the story takes off.

I liked this book. Writers of historical novels, especially when there is more fiction than fact, walk a fine line. They must honor the history and the known facts while writing a novel with an engaging narrative and characters that the audience will want to follow.  What the author was able to do very well was meld fact and fiction is a story of a very strong woman in an era when women were simply chattel to the men around them. Aemilia is a character who is very strong, but understands her world and how to survive in it while remaining true to herself.

I absolutely recommend it.

 

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Review, Books, Feminism, History, William Shakespeare, Writing

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s