Daily Archives: October 29, 2017

Thoughts On The 5th Anniversary Of Hurricane Sandy And The Prevalence Of Climate Change

Anyone who lived through Hurricane Sandy five years ago can easily tell you where they were and how they somehow survived.  Today is the 5th anniversary of Hurricane Sandy.

We believed, back then, that Hurricane Sandy was a once in a lifetime storm for the New York City area. It would go into the history books and we would move on with our lives. It was just another Hurricane.

Cut to this year. Hurricanes Harvey, Irma,  Jose and Maria left a wake of destruction in Texas, Florida, the Caribbean and Puerto Rico respectively. Puerto Rico is still dealing with the aftermath of Hurricane Maria.

Despite what the deniers will say, climate change is real. We, as a species, are shooting ourselves in our collective feet and pretending that we are not. When Donald Trump announced earlier this year that the US would be removing itself from the Paris Climate Agreement, he once again opened his mouth just to shove his foot in it.

Climate change may not be happening as quickly as it appears in the movies, but it is very real. If we live to see our grandchildren born, we may be asked some questions, that we as a generation may not be able to answer.

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Filed under History, New York City

An American Family: A Memoir of Hope and Sacrifice Book Review

Khizr and Ghazala Khan entered the national consciousness in 2016 at the Democratic National Convention. Their second son, Humayun Khan, joined the army and died in service to his country in 2004. Speaking to a national audience and to Donald Trump, they represent the ideals that America stands for.

Earlier this year, Mr. Khan published his memoir, entitled, An American Family: A Memoir of Hope and Sacrifice. He starts with his childhood in Pakistan, takes the reader through his life, from his childhood in Pakistan, through his adult life (including his marriage, becoming a father, and immigrating to America) and ends the book with speaking at the Democratic National Convention last year. Asked by Hillary Clinton’s camp to speak at the convention, Mr. Khan left a mark on the national culture that few private citizens can say they have made.

While the early part of the book relating to Mr. Khan early life were a little slow, by the end, the book left a mark on my conscious. He writes so earnestly, that I feel like I know this man and I feel feel for him and his family. They lost in their son, but instead just becoming another gold star family, they have become a symbol for the best of America.

I recommend it.

 

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Filed under Book Review, Books, History, Politics