Daily Archives: June 22, 2018

New Randy Rainbow Video-WTF, YOU GUYS!? – Randy Rainbow Song Parody (NSFW)

Politics and politicians never fail to elicit a WTF response from the populous. This particular administration has had more than a few WTF moments in the last year and a half and probably will produce quite a few more before the 2020 election.

Randy Rainbow’s new video, WTF, YOU GUYS!? – Randy Rainbow Song Parody (NSFW), is a parody of the song, “Omigod You Guys”, which is the opening number from the musical adaptation of the film Legally Blonde.

In the pantheon of Randy Rainbow videos, this is just another perfect satirical sendoff of the reality of current American politics.

BTW, in case anyone is interested, the original song is below.

Keep it coming, Randy Rainbow. Your country needs you.

 

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Filed under Music, Politics, Randy Rainbow

Stay: A History of Suicide and the Arguments Against It Book Review

It’s a proven fact that many who suffer from mental health issues have considered or have acted on suicidal thoughts. In the United States, suicide is quickly become one of the leading causes of death. But there is light at the end of the tunnel.

Writer Jennifer Michael Hecht knows all too well the pain that losing a loved one to suicide brings. Her 2013 book, Stay: A History of Suicide and the Arguments Against It, was inspired by the loss of two friends to suicide. In the book, Ms. Hecht examines how suicide was viewed in the past by different cultures and how these cultures argued against suicide. She also examines how attitudes in regards to suicide have changed, but the reasons to live remain the same.

This book was not only well written, but eye opening. Suicide has been part of the human experience for an untold number of generations. For me, living with mental illness, the most important reason for reading this book was the argument that life is worth it. Suicide is permanent, pain can and does heal.

I recommend it.

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Filed under Book Review, Books, History, Mental Health

Flashback Friday-Evan Almighty (2007)

Many go into politics for altruistic reasons. Whether or not their reasons change over time is to be seen.

In the 2007 film Evan Almighty (a sequel to the 2003 film Bruce Almighty), Evan Baxter (Steve Carell) has changed careers. After spending years reporting the news, he becomes the news when he is elected to Congress. Sensing that Evan is a virgin politician, Congressman Long (John Goodman) is trying to pressure Evan to co-sponsor a bill that will allow developers to re-create the National Parks in their own image. Then G-d (Morgan Freeman, reprising his role from Bruce Almighty) tells Evan to build an ark. Evan is not exactly a believer in the instructions he has received. Torn between co-sponsoring the bill and the more than obvious signs from G-d, Evan has to make a decision. Should he save the world or co-sponsor the bill?

As sequels go, the film is not that bad. I also certainly appreciate the message about taking care of the environment. This film is the type of film that you might see in theaters or find it while flipping through the channels on a rainy weekend afternoon. But it is the best sequel ever? Not really.

Do I recommend it? Maybe.

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Filed under Flashback Friday, Movie Review, Movies, Politics

The Band’s Visit Musical Review

Sometimes, fate surprises us. We learn and grow in the most surprising ways.

In the play The Band’s Visit (based on the film of the same name) a band from Egypt is scheduled to play at the opening of an Arab Cultural Center in Israel. A mistake is made and they take the bus to the wrong city.  The locals take them in for the night. The leader of the band, Tewfiq (DARIUSH KASHANI) beds down for the night with Dina (KATRINA LENK), the owner of a small cafe. What starts out as a night of hospitality turns into a friendship and a conversation about being human and the experiences we have.

I loved this show. It absolutely deserved the 10 Tony Awards that were conferred on the show by the Tony voters. What makes the show interesting is that it has the running time of a play (about 90 minutes), but it has the narrative structure and character arc of a musical (using song and dance to tell the story). I read somewhere that the show stands out because it speaks to the heart and the intelligence of the audience, instead of appealing to the audience’s baser instincts when it comes to Broadway shows.

But what makes the show stand out for me is the fact that it speaks to the idea that even when two groups of people who are known not to like each other, individuals on opposite sides of the conflict can find common ground and perhaps friendship.

I absolutely recommend it.

The Band’s Visit is playing at the Ethel Barrymore Theater at 243 W 47th Street in New York City. Check the website for ticket prices and showtimes. 

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Filed under Broadway Musical Review, New York City

Robert F. Kennedy: Ripples of Hope: Kerry Kennedy in Conversation with Heads of State, Business Leaders, Influencers, and Activists about Her Father’s Impact on Their Lives Book Review

In the late 1960’s, Robert F. Kennedy was a beacon of hope and light in the darkness and chaos that defined the era. He was gunned down in 1968 by an assassin while on the Presidential campaign trail. Though his body has long since returned to the earth, his legacy lives on.

One of his children, activist Kerry Kennedy compiled a list of interviews about her father’s legacy in to a book entitled Robert F. Kennedy: Ripples of Hope: Kerry Kennedy in Conversation with Heads of State, Business Leaders, Influencers, and Activists about Her Father’s Impact on Their Lives. Interviewing politicians, performers, activists and others, the book details how RFK continues to inspire us fifty years after his death.

This book is amazing. While the interviewees are vastly different, the message is the same. RFK represented what America could be and challenged her citizens to step up to create the America he believed could one day exist.

I recommend it.

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Filed under Book Review, Books, History