Daily Archives: October 7, 2018

Burden: A Preacher, a Klansman, and a True Story of Redemption in the Modern South Book Review

The American ideal is that all citizens are equal, regardless of any labels that we or others may use to define an individual. But we all know that the reality does not match the ideal.

The new book, Burden: A Preacher, a Klansman, and a True Story of Redemption in the Modern South, written by journalist Courtney Hargrave is the story of an unlikely friendship. In 1996, the small town of Laurens, South Carolina received worldwide media attention when Michael Burden opened a museum celebrating the history of the Klu Klux Klan.  Among those who protested the museum was Revered David Kennedy, the Reverend of a local African-American Church who would at a later date, hold out his hand in friendship and camaraderie when Michael was at his lowest.

Soon to be an upcoming movie starring Garrett Hedlund and Forest Whitaker, I found the book to be remarkable. It spoke to the idea that despite our pasts, change is possible. We can movie past racism and prejudice and see the person beyond the label.

I recommend it.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Review, Books, History, Movies

Colette Movie Review

It has been said that behind every great man is great woman. But what happens when that woman decides to take the spotlight on her own?

In the new movie, Colette, Colette (Keira Knightley) is a young lady from the countryside who married the much older Willy (Dominic West) around the turn of the 20th century. Willy earns his living as a writer, but does not do the writing himself. He has a team of writers who work under him. Soon after taking their vows, Colette join her husband’s writing team. Her books become the most popular fiction of the day. But while Willy gets the acclaim, Colette remains in the shadows. That is, until she decides to not only publicize the truth of the authorship of the book and while doing so, flouts gender norms.

Based on the true story of Colette, whose full name was Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, this movie is not the typical BPD (British Period Drama). It resonates with modern audiences because it still speaks to us today. Questions in regards to gender norms, gender identities, sexual identities, a woman fighting for her voice to be heard are still being asked in 2018.

I recommend it.

Colette is currently in theaters. 

Leave a comment

Filed under Books, Feminism, History, Movie Review, Movies, Writing

Shame On You, Susan Collins

There is a special place in hell for women who don’t support other women, especially when it comes to allegations of sexual assault.

Senator Susan Collins voted to proceed with the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to join the Supreme Court. The result is that her opponent has received a tidy sum from voters in donations.

The message coming from the Senate is clear. The voice of the American woman does not matter. Her experience does not matter, especially when it comes to rape and/or sexual assault. While the woman has to live for the rest of her life with the emotional trauma that comes with sexual assault, the man is free and clear to move on with his life as if nothing happened.

The law of the land is innocent until proven guilty, as Mitch McConnell pointed out. However, the accusations against Judge Kavanaugh are severe enough to create questions of his ability to be impartial and non-partisan.

I started writing this post yesterday. As of this morning, Judge Kavanaugh is the newest member of the Supreme Court.

What is done cannot be undone. However, the midterms are coming. American voters will have their say when it comes to who will representing them in Washington.  While only time will tell how the makeup of the Senate will change, I have a feeling that some Senators may find themselves out of a job.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Feminism, National News, Politics