Daily Archives: May 13, 2019

If the Democrats Want to Win the 2020 Election, I Suggest That They Squash the Antisemitism In Their Party

For the nearly twenty years that I have been able to vote, I have voted mostly Democrat. My family has been also voting along the Democratic lines for as long as I can remember.

I hate to say it, but I may have to rethink my political affiliation. Earlier today, Representative Rashida Tlaib (D-MI) made some comments regarding Israel, Palestine and the Holocaust are not only historically inaccurate, but they also have the capacity to inflame what is already a dangerous conflict. During the interview, she stated the following:

“There’s kind of a calming feeling I always tell folks when I think of the Holocaust, and the tragedy of the Holocaust, and the fact that it was my ancestors, Palestinians, who lost their land and some lost their lives, their livelihood, their human dignity, their existence in many ways, have been wiped out, and some people’s passports. I mean, just all of it was in the name of trying to create a safe haven for Jews, post-the Holocaust, post-the tragedy and the horrific persecution of Jews across the world at that time, and I love the fact that it was my ancestors that provided that, right, in many ways. But they did it in a way that took their human dignity away, right, and it was forced on them,” she said.

There are a number of inaccuracies that I would like correct the Representative on.

  1. The origin of the name Palestine comes from the Greeks who conquered ancient Israel and changed the name to prevent future generations from identifying Israel as their homeland.
  2. Before 1948, anyone who called the British Mandate of Palestine home was a Palestinian, even those of the Jewish faith.
  3. When Israel was declared to be an independent state, Arab leaders at the time promised a quick and easy war to remove the Jews and establish a new Arab state. The war did not go as planned. Meanwhile, no one talks about the Jews who were living in Muslim countries and had to leave everything behind to stay alive.

I am the first to admit that the actions of the Israeli government are not always perfect. I am the first to agree that there is racism is Israel, as there is everywhere in the world. But it is the only legitimate democracy in the Middle East, where all citizens are treated equally.

I don’t want to have to change my political party. I have no doubt that antisemitism exists in the Republican and Independent parties. But the fact is that if the Democrats do not excise this wound, they may lose the 2020 election. The last thing I want is to have you know who win another four years in office.

P.S. If you are interested in additional reading, Liel Leibovitz’s excellent article in Tablet Magazine hits the nail on the head.

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Filed under History, International News, Politics, World News

Going to the Mountain: Life Lessons from My Grandfather, Nelson Mandela Book Review

The old saying of not appreciating something or someone until it is gone can apply to any aspect our lives. All of my grandparents have long since passed away, but I still miss them. As a child, I did not fully appreciate them and their impact on my life. As an adult, I wish I could have had more time with them.

Ndaba Mandela grew up in his grandfather, Nelson Mandela‘s house. His 2018 book, Going to the Mountain: Life Lessons from My Grandfather, Nelson Mandela, is about growing up with his grandfather. While the world knew Nelson Mandela as a civil rights leader and humanitarian, Ndaba simply knew him as “granddad”.

It was a unique experience. While Ndaba would have preferred to have the household rules relaxed (as many young people who live with strict parents hope for), he also watched and listened as his grandfather interacted with world leaders and local government officials. Along the way, Ndaba absorbed wisdom as only one can with a grandparent who is active in their life.

I really appreciated this book. I appreciated it because shines a light on the human side of Mandela instead of just telling his story as an icon of recent history. I also felt like I related to Ndaba because I too, grew up with strict parents.

I recommend it.

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Filed under Book Review, Books, History, Life

RIP Doris Day

There is something special about an old Hollywood movie. A certain quality of film making that today is sometimes pushed aside for the latest and greatest technology.

Today, we lost one of the icons of old Hollywood, Doris Day.

During her heyday, Day was on of the most recognized performers in the world. A triple threat, she could act, sing and dance like nobody’s business. Looking back, her image was emblematic of the period. With her blue eyes and blonde hair, she was the all-American women. Day’s most notable parts were as the sexualized virgin: smart, sassy, romantic and convincing her leading man to fall in love with her, marry her and take her to bed without directly saying so.

My favorite Doris Day film is Pillow Talk. Playing opposite her long time friend and collaborator, Rock Hudson. While there are certain elements of the film that are very dated, the comedy and the double entendres still hold up to this day.

My favorite song of her’s is her most famous: Que Sera Sera from the Hitchcock film, The Man Who Knew Too Much. It’s one of those songs that I think still hold up to this day.

Wherever you are in heaven, Doris Day, RIP. May your memory be a blessing.

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Filed under Movies