Daily Archives: January 8, 2021

New Randy Rainbow Video-SEDITION! – A Randy Rainbow Parody

The accusation of sedition is a serious one. It is not to be taken lightly or without being unaware of the consequences of what is being said.

Back in 1918, the Sedition act of 1918 was enshrined as law. In a nutshell, it is described as follows:

“Willfully utter, print, write, or publish any disloyal, profane, scurrilous, or abusive language about the form of the Government of the United States”

I think most Americans would say that the so-called “protest” (aka riot) that happened on Wednesday afternoon is more than enough to strongly consider the allegation of sedition. Not just for you know who, but for his enablers, and those who stormed into the Capitol building hoping to overturn the results of the election.

Randy Rainbow release his new video this afternoon. Entitled “SEDITION! – A Randy Rainbow Parody“, it is a take-off on the song “Tradition” from the musical Fiddler on the Roof.

I have said many times that Rainbow is a genius. This time, I have no choice but to get on my figurative knees and bow down to this man. After the chaos and destruction, it is clear that changes must be made. It is also clear that we cannot just sweep what has happened under the rug. We need to face it head-on, take a good look in the mirror, and learn from our mistakes.

Happy Friday.

P.S. If there is one bright spot, it is that you know who has been permanently banned from Twitter.

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Filed under Music, National News, Politics, Randy Rainbow

World on Fire Character Review: Webster O’Connor

*For the foreseeable future, some Character Review posts may not be published every Thursday as they have in the past.

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series World on Fire. Read at your own risk if you have not watched the show.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front of us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations. The truth of human sexuality is that it has always been a spectrum. But for most of our time on Earth, the only acceptable sexual relationship has been between a man and a woman. It is only in the last few decades (depending on where one lives) that members of the LGBTQ community are free to live and love as they want to.

On World on Fire, Webster O’Connor (Brian J. Smith) is an American doctor working and living in Paris as World War II rumbles on the horizon. He is also gay. Before the Germans invade the country, Webster is able to live openly as a gay man (well, as much as one could back then). Happily involved with Albert Fallou (Parker Sawyers), Webster does not listen to his aunt, Nancy Campbell (Helen Hunt) when she strongly recommends that he return to the States.

Then the Battle of France happens and Webster is stuck behind enemy lines. As both an American and a member of the LGBTQ community, he knows how dangerous it is to remain in France. But his Caucasian complexion and his assumed Christian faith have so far kept Webster off of the Nazi’s radar. Feeling that he has to do something, Webster and his colleague/nurse Henriette Guilbert (Eugénie Derouand), hatch a plan to get prisoners of war out of France before the Nazis can get their hands on them.

To sum it up: I suspect that many people in Webster’s situation would have taken his aunt’s advice. Having stayed for love, Webster is completely aware of the situation he is now in. But. he also knows that doing his part to save lives is dangerous. Having the courage to do that makes him a hero in my book.

Which is why he is a memorable character.

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Filed under Character Review, History, Television

Flashback Friday: Good Bones (2016-Present)

Watching HGTV, the impression one gets is that home building and renovation industry is a gendered one. The man handle the construction and the women are in charge of the decor.

Good Bones premiered on the channel in 2016 and has been a regular part of the schedule ever since. The redheaded mother-daughter duo Karen E. Laine and Mina Starsiak Hawk, co-owners of Two Chicks and a Hammer, renovate and restore houses in their home town of Indianapolis. As is expected, there are issues along the way. But the hope is that once the home is done, it will be sold for a nice profit.

What I like about this show is the unique mother/daughter relationship. Mina is the levelheaded one while Karen is more creative. I also love that it disputes the myth that women are only able to and/or not interested in the construction aspect of home building and renovation.

Do I recommend it? Yes.

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Filed under Feminism, Flashback Friday, Television, TV Review