Daily Archives: March 17, 2021

Perhaps Cancel Culture Went a Little Far With Pepé Le Pew

Cancel culture is the rage these days. Depending on who one speaks to, it has either gone too far or not far enough.

The latest target is Pepé Le Pew, the overly romantic French skunk from the Warner Brothers cartoon whose passionate overtures always fail. The claim is that he encourages rape culture by forcing himself on whatever female character is nearby, regardless of whether or not she is looking for love.

I am all for dismantling rape culture. Frankly, it should have been gotten rid of a long time ago.

However, for once, I have to disagree in regards to the cancellation of this particular character. Any adult watching this cartoon knows that it is satire. We all know how it ends. His attempt once again backfires more and it is onto the next potential partner.

From a parental perspective, I understand the concern. If that is the case, it is up to the adults to sit their children down and explain why this behavior is wrong. Cancelling everything that is outdated or disapproved of will not change things. That requires open conversations and the difficult task of taking an honest look at the darker aspects of our collective histories.

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Filed under Feminism, National News

The Ravine: A Family, a Photograph, a Holocaust Massacre Revealed Book Review

It has been said that a picture is worth a thousand words.

The Ravine: A Family, a Photograph, a Holocaust Massacre Revealed, by Wendy Lower, was published last month.

Back in 2009, Lower was shown a photograph taken during World War II. It shows the the massacre of Jews in an open pit (known as the Holocaust by Bullets) outside of a town in the Ukraine. The Ukrainian man holding the rifle is aiming for a woman who is holding the hand of a little boy. Taking the picture to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington D.C., she was determined to find out the fate and identities of those in the picture.

I loved this book. It takes a moment within this time period and blows it up in a way that humanizes this very dark period in history. When most people think of the Holocaust, they think of the ghettos and the concentration camps. They don’t think of the millions who were forced to dig their own graves before being murdered.

Do I recommend it? Absolutely.

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Filed under Book Review, Books, History