Daily Archives: June 14, 2021

Why She Wrote: A Graphic History of the Lives Inspiration and Influence Behind the Pens of Classic Women Writers Book Review

It takes a brave or naïve person (or both) to step out of the boundaries that the world around them has created. This person knows that when they start to think for themselves, there is a potential firestorm of naysayers and finger pointing. But they do it anyway.

Why She Wrote: A Graphic History of the Lives Inspiration and Influence Behind the Pens of Classic Women Writers, was published in April. Written by Lauren Burke and Hannah K Chapman (hosts of one of my favorite podcasts, Bonnets at Dawn) with artwork by Kaley Bales, the book tells the story of some of the greatest women writers of the 19th and 20 centuries. In additional to listing their most well known works and providing a brief biography, the book also highlights how these women paved the way for future generations to succeed as both women and writers. The list includes Jane Austen, Anne Bronte, Charlotte Bronte, Emily Bronte, George Eliot, etc.

I loved this book. The artwork is beautiful, the description of the subjects are beautifully written. It made we want to learn more about these women and continue to work towards the day when my writing will be as good and inspiring as theirs.

Do I recommend it?

Absolutely.

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Filed under Anne Bronte, Book Review, Books, Charlotte Bronte, Emily Bronte, Feminism, George Eliot, History, Jane Austen, Podcast

A Radical Awakening: Turn Pain into Power Embrace, Your Truth, Live Free Book Review

There are two ways to deal with an emotionally painful past. We can either let it control us. Or, we can do what we need to do to no longer be tied to it.

A Radical Awakening: Turn Pain into Power, Embrace Your Truth, Live Free, by renowned psychiatrist Dr. Shefali was published last month. Speaking directly to her female readers, she examines all of the ways in which we are holding ourselves back. She talks not just about mental health issues, but the detrimental problems that are directly connected to the way that women are taught to behave and think.

Though it was not the complete literal gut punch the author promised, there were still parts of the book were emotionally difficult to read. What I appreciated was addressing the fact that many women these days are torn between the traditional idea of womanhood and living their own lives on their own terms.

Do I recommend it? Yes.

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Filed under Book Review, Books, Feminism, Mental Health