Author Archives: Writergurlny

About Writergurlny

I am Brooklyn, NY born and raised writer who needs writing to find sanity in an insane world. To quote Charlotte Bronte: “I'm just going to write because I cannot help it.”

New Randy Rainbow Video: Clang, Clang, Clang Went Josh Hawley! – A Randy Rainbow Song Parody

We are all entitled to our opinions and beliefs. We are also entitled to express those opinions and beliefs without fear of being thrown in jail or killed by the government. That being said, there is a line between saying what we believe and encouraging violence.

Randy Rainbow’s latest video is entitled Clang, Clang, Clang Went Josh Hawley! – A Randy Rainbow Song Parody. It is based on The Trolley Song from the 1944 film, Meet Me in St. Louis, starring Judy Garland.

It is as if these people are playing the game of top that, of who can be the “best” Republican and the biggest brownnoser of you know who. There is no logic or method to the madness, with the exception of grabbing as much power as they can and not letting go it.

I don’t know about you, but I am hoping they get their asses handed to them during the 2022 midterm elections.

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Filed under Movies, Music, National News, Politics, Randy Rainbow

Andrew Yang is Wrong for NYC

A general election for any major role in government is akin to a horse race. Many will enter, but there can only be one winner.

This fall, New Yorkers will go to the polls to determine who will be our next Mayor. Among the candidates is businessman and former 2020 Presidential candidate Andrew Yang.

My personal feeling is that he is the wrong person for the job. He has good ideas (universal basic income, for one), but does he have the experience and the ability to follow through on these ideas? I honestly don’t know.

One that makes me question him is the fact that when Covid-19 hit the city last year, Yang and his family moved to the suburbs. While I understand the reasons for the move, it makes me wonder if he can truly handle a major crisis, should he be elected? We need a mayor who will step up, not find an excuse to not do their job.

At this point, I have not decided who I will vote for. But will it be Andrew Yang? Probably not.

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Filed under New York City, Politics

Rockets Were Fired at Israel Today

I want you to imagine the following: you live in a neighborhood in which your neighbors at best tolerate you and at worst, call for your death. When you are attacked and you defend yourself, you are accused of being a bully.

This is the situation today in Israel. Rockets were fired into civilian populations in Jerusalem and Southern Israel from the Gaza strip.

I could write about this topic until I am blue in the face. I could write a dissertation if I was so inclined. Instead, I will let Hananya Nafatali explain why real peace in this region of the world has yet to exist.

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Filed under International News, World News

The Potential Ouster of Liz Cheney is a Bad Sign of Things to Come

Politics is a game of give and take. For a government to function, there must be compromise and the willingness to work with the other side.

The latest news from the capitol is that Representative Liz Cheney may be ousted from a leadership position from within the Republican party due to her open critique of you know who. While some of her colleagues within the party stand with her, there many others are blindly loyal to the former President.

There has always been a division in this country between Republican and Democrat. It is a normal and healthy part of a nation whose laws are based on Democratic principles. However, there is a distinct line between the typical political disagreement and threatening a politician because he or she does not automatically bow down and kiss the behind of “dear leader”.

I am going to end this post with a tweet from Andrea Junker because it is eerily prophetic and a warning for us all.

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Filed under History, National News, Politics

Happy Mother’s Day

This is for my mother and all the mothers out there. Happy Mother’s Day!

“My Mother: She is beautiful, softened at the edges and tempered with a spine of steel. I want to grow old and be like her.”-Jodi Picoult

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Filed under Books, Feminism, Misc

Where Hands Touch Movie Review

When we think of the Holocaust, we think of the six millions Jews that were murdered. While that fact is undeniable, other groups were also targeted for persecution and murder. Among those were Rhineland Bastards. One parent was White and German, the other was of African descent.

In the 2018 film, Where Hands Touch, fifteen year old Lena (Amandla Stenberg) is one of these children. Her White mother, Kerstin (Abbie Cornish), is a single mother. Lena’s father is no longer in the picture. Kerstin is doing her best to protect both of her children from the racial laws imposed on the country. While her son is considered to be a “good German”, her daughter has a target on her back. When Lena meets and falls for Lutz (George McKay), the son of a Nazi official and a member of Hitler Youth, things get even more complicated.

I enjoyed this movie. It was a story that I was aware of in the general sense, but I was fuzzy on the details. The one thing that stuck out to me was the character arcs. If nothing else, it shows how dangerous this mentality is, specifically when a nation sets on a path of destruction of their own citizens that is based on identity.

Do I recommend it? Yes

Where Hands Touch is available for streaming on The Roku Channel.

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Filed under Feminism, History, Movie Review, Movies

Recipe for a Perfect Wife: A Novel Book Review

For generations, the suburbs has been an ideal place to live. But as perfect as they may appear to be, no one can be predict what happens when the doors to the neighbors houses are closed.

Karma Brown‘s 2018 book, Recipe for a Perfect Wife: A Novel, takes place in the northern suburbs of New York City. The book follows two different women in two different time periods. In our time, Alice Hale worked in public relations before leaving the city and her career for a new life as a home owner and a writer. While her husband is at work, Alice has to get used to her new surroundings. While going down to the basement, she discovers old magazines, recipes, and a series of unsent letters written by a previous owner. In the 1950’s, Nellie Murdoch was a housewife who was living the dream. To the outside world, Nellie’s life is faultless. But if one were to step inside the Murdoch home, they would see that her marriage is not all sunshine and roses.

As she learns about Nellie, Alice begins to explore her own life and question her choices.

Brown is not the first author and will certainly never be the last one who uses this type of narrative. The book is not badly written. Far from it, the narrative is captivating and the characters fit well into the world. But it is missing a certain something that makes it stand out.

Do I recommend it? Maybe.

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Filed under Book Review, Books, Feminism, New York City

Jupiter’s Legacy Review

As children, all we want is to please our parents and make them proud of us. When that wish stays with us as adults, it holds a power over our lives as few things can.

The new Netflix series, Jupiter’s Legacy, is based on the comic book by Mark Millar of the same name. Sheldon Sampson/The Utopian (Josh Duhamel) is not the young man he was once was. Part of a society of superheroes, he has lived by a code of ethics that has been his moral backbone for decades. Married to Grace Kennedy Sampson/Lady Liberty (Leslie Bibb), they have two grown children. Their son Brandon, known as the Paragon (Andrew Horton) is doing everything he can to live up to his father’s expectations. But no matter what he does, nothing feels like it will ever be enough. Their daughter, Chloe (Elena Kampouris) has chosen another life entirely.

It is up to Brandon and Chloe’s generation to continue the legacy of their parents generation going. But as it usually happens between parents and children, that continuation is complicated.

This review is solely based on the series. I had never heard of the comic book until last night, when I sat down to watch the program. What I liked was that the characters are emotionally and physically fallible, and not the images of perfection that other characters in the genre are made out to be. The first two episodes were fine, but I was lost by the third episode. Whatever emotional connections I made with the characters dissapeared.

Do I recommend it? Maybe

Jupiter’s Legacy is available for streaming on Netflix.

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Filed under Netflix, Television, TV Review

The Nanny Character Review: Maggie Sheffield

*For the foreseeable future, some Character Review posts may not be published every Thursday as they have in the past.

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series The Nanny. Read at your own risk if you have not watched the show. There is something to be said about a well-written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front of us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

Let’s be honest, being a teenager is scary. Our hormones are raging, we are confused about everything, and we are trying to build the bridge from childhood to adulthood. On The Nanny, Maggie Sheffield, the oldest of the three Sheffield children, (Nicholle Tom) is initially introduced as a shy young woman in her early teens. Her first burst of change comes via her first kiss from a waiter who has been hired for an event at the Sheffield home. While her father, Maxwell Sheffield (Charles Shaughnessy) is horrified, her new nanny, Fran Fine (Fran Drescher) is thrilled.

As Maggie grows up, Fran becomes more like an older sister/confidant than a paid member of the household staff. While her father does everything he can to keep her from growing up, Fran encourages Maggie to enjoy her teenage years. She also gets quite a bit of brotherly ribbing from her younger brother Brighton (Benjamin Salisbury). When we last see Maggie, she is a newly married to a Jewish underwear novel.

To sum it up: What makes Maggie relatable as a character is that she is a normal teenage girl. She is watched like a hawk by her father, teased by her kid brother and encouraged to enjoy life by the maternal figure in her life.

Which is why she is a memorable character.

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Filed under Character Review, Feminism, New York City, Television

Flashback Friday: The Good Son (1993)

When one chooses to become an actor, they don’t choose (if they are able to make a decent living) to play the same type of character over and over again. Which is why the choice to play against type is exciting The question is, will this actor succeed in playing a role that the audience does not see coming?

In the 1993 film, The Good Son, Mark (Elijah Wood) has just lost his mother. When his father goes on a business trip to Asia, he is sent Maine to stay with his aunt and uncle. Mark spends his days with his cousin Henry (Macaulay Culkin). Henry initially seems like the average kid. Somewhere along the way, he starts to show a side of himself that is darker and scarier than Mark could have ever imagined.

Back in the day, the reviewers had mixed responses to the film. To be completely honest, I have not seen the movie in full. I just remember seeing part of it in the early 90’s and getting chills watching Culkin play this child who is far from Kevin McCallister as you can get.

Do I recommend it? Maybe.

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Filed under Movie Review, Movies