Category Archives: Broadway Play Review

When We Were Young And Unafraid Review

When We Were Young And Unafraid is the best play of 2014.

In the early 1970’s, Agnes (Cherry Jones) runs a bed and breakfast while raising her teenage daughter, Penny (Morgan Saylor) on an island near Seattle, Washington. The bed and breakfast is a cover for an underground battered women’s shelter. Mary Anne  (Zoe Kazan, granddaughter of the legendary director Elia Kazan) is running from her abusive husband.  Paul (Patch Darragh) is one of Agnes’s clients, seeking shelter from his own past.  Hannah (Cherise Boothe) came to the island looking for work and the womyns group she has been following.

This play is beyond magnificent. The topics of feminism, homosexuality, abortion, spousal abuse, teenage angst is written in such a way by playwright Sarah Treem that instead of being preachy or soapboxy, it intertwines with the secrets that we all have.  Put against the backdrop of the early 1970’s, when the world was changing, this play is dynamic, powerful and everything a play should be.

I highly recommend this play.

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The Cripple of Inishmaan Review

Daniel Radcliffe is an exceptional actor. At the the young age of 24, he has starred in one of the biggest movie franchises of all time. In the three years since the release of the final Harry Potter film, Radcliffe has continued to show audiences that he can play characters that are far from the world of his bespectacled wizardly alter ego.

His new play, The Cripple of Inishmaan is about a small island off the coast of Ireland. Among the residents of this island is Billy (Radcliffe), a orphaned young man born with a physical deformity. When Hollywood visits to make a film about their island, the residents hope for a chance for stardom. Vying for this chance of stardom is the very funny and mouthy brother and sister duo of  Helen and Bartley McCormick (Sarah Greene and Conor MacNeill). Billy’s aunts, Kate and Eileen Osbourne (Ingrid Craigie and Gillian Hanna), who have raised Billy since his parent’s death, are equal parts concerned about him and quick to remind him of his deformity.

This play is very good and very funny. While most of the characters have a small town mentality, Billy is eager to leave his small town and find opportunity in Hollywood. The supporting cast is well chosen and very funny.

I recommend this play.

 

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A Dolls House- A Timeless Masterpeice

It is a truth universally acknowledged that certain stories are meant to live forever, re-visited and introduced again and again to audiences.

Such is Henrik Ibsen’s masterpiece, A Doll’s House, presently at the Brooklyn Academy Of Music until March 23rd.

Nora and Torvald Helmer (Hattie Morahan and Dominic Rowan, Elinor Dashwood in the 2008 Sense and Sensibility and Mr. Elton in the 1996 Kate Beckinsale Emma, for my fellow Janeites) have been married for nine years.  The play opens just before Christmas, Torvald is waiting for a promotion to bank manager, which will mean a raise. His wife, Nora, appears to be flighty and somewhat dimwitted.

The arrival of Nora’s childhood friend, Kristine Linde (Caroline Martin) reveals that Nora is much more than she appears.  Early into her marriage, Torvald became sick.  Following doctors orders, they traveled to Italy where the warm weather was recommended to improve Torvald’s health. Unbeknownst to her husband, Nora took out a loan which she is secretly paying off and has not told him. One of her husband’s employees, Nils Krogstad (Nick Fletcher) knows that he will be out for a job very soon and tries to use the unpaid loan to get his job back.

This play is amazing. Morahan is perfect for Nora and Rowan is equally as perfect as Torvald.  The tension is there from the moment that it starts. The audience knows Nora’s secret and we all know that it will only be a matter of time before Torvald finds out. The slamming of the door at the final moments of play reverberated throughout the theater.

I’ve heard of this play, but I’ve never seen it.  I hope to see it next time it comes my way.

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The Glass Menagerie- Timeless

There is a reason that Tennessee Williams is one of the most brilliant playwrights of the 20th century. His characters are so human, full of the same experiences, joys and mistakes that we all go through in life.

This weekend, I saw a revival of The Glass Menagerie starring Cherry Jones.

The Glass Menagerie is the story of a family living in the midwest during the 1930’s. Amanda Wingfield  is a single mother living with her adult children, Tom (Zachary Quinto) and Laura (Celia Keenan-Bolger).  Tom is working at a local factory and frequently argues with his mother. Laura is walks with a limp and only socializes with her mother and brother, suffering from anxiety attacks if she has to socialize with anyone else.

Amanda is determined to bring in gentleman callers for her daughter and fondly remembers her youth and the gentleman callers she used to entertain.  When Tom bring in a gentleman caller (Brian J Smith) home for dinner, a slim chance of happiness and marital bliss appears for Laura, only for it to be smashed into tiny pieces by the end of the play.

Tennessee Williams is one of my favorite playwrights. I love Streetcar Named Desire, it’s one of the most brilliant plays ever written, Blanche Bubois is hands down one of the great characters ever created.  The same themes of reality vs. fantasy, the dream like memories of the past vs. the rough and not so nice present appear in both plays.

Cherry Jones is a wonder in this part. I saw her a few years ago in Mrs. Warren’s Profession. She blew me away then and she blew me away this weekend. Zachary Quinto and Celia Keenan-Bolger as her children seem on stage as if they are really siblings, instead of actors pretending to be siblings. Brian J Smith as the gentleman caller gives the audience hope that Laura may find the happiness that both she and her mother want to have.

The play closes on February 23rd. If you have the opportunity to get tickets, I highly recommend this show.

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A Scar For A Scar- Simple Yet Perfect

This weekend, I bought ticket to a limited run of Lemieux and Pilon’s La Belle et la Bete at  BAM.

It ran only three performances, but if this production comes to a theater near you, I highly reccomend it.

There have been numerous adaptations of Beauty and The Beast over the years, most famously, the Disney movie from the early 90’s.

But none as simple and powerful at this adaptation.

Stripped down to a 90 minute three act play with only three characters on a nearly empty stage, the special effects assist the story and the actors without overwhelming them.

The thing that makes this adaptation so memorable is that a single line in the play is all you need to know about the lead characters “A scar for a scar”.

Stripped of the 16th century trappings of the original story and the Disneyfied singing and dancing household objects, Beauty and Beast is a very simple, beautiful and timeless tale. It is the tale of two people, who have been knocked down by life, who feel like outsiders, who each bear scars from their pasts. Through their interactions with each other, they begin to heal, accept themselves and find the internal peace they have been searching for.

I wish it had a longer run, but I am glad I had a chance to see it this weekend. I would most certainly see it again if it came to my area.

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Not So Assembled- The Assembled Parties Review

Earlier this year, noted playright Richard Greenberg introduced audiences to his new play “The Assembled Parties“.

The play takes place in a 14 room apartment on Central Park West belonging on the Bascovs, a secular Jewish family. Julie (Jessica Hecht) is married to Ben (Jonathan Walker). They have two sons, 20 something Scott (Jake Silberman) and preschooler Timmmy (Jake Silbermann as the adult Timmy and Alex Dreier as the young Timmy).

Its Christmas Day, invited for dinner is Scott’s friend, Jeff (Jeremy Shamos), Ben’s sister Faye (Judith Light), her husband Mort (Mark Blum) and their daughter Shelley (Lauren Blumenfeld). The first act is set in 1980, the second act is set in 2000.

Vying for the best and funniest lines are Hecht and Light. In the second act, Shamos is the steady head in between these two women.

The cast is very good and very funny. I cannot say the same for the play.

The plot is thin, the departure of several characters within the second act is barely explained. By the end of the play I found myself asking questions that were unanswered by the final curtain call.

Not one of the better plays I have seen.

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Talley’s Folley Review

Talley’s Folley is a one act, two character play set in Lebanon Missouri, 1944 in a dilapidated Victoria era boathouse. Written by the late Lanford Wilson, it is about an immigrant attempting to rekindle a romance with a woman fighting her own insecurities.

It is in short, one of the most brillant, simplest, well done plays I have ever seen.

Salley Talley (Sarah Paulson) is the daughter of an old money Missouri family. At age 31, she is presently single with little hope of marriage. Matt Friedman (Danny Burnstein) is 42 and a Jewish refugee from Hitler’s Europe. They had a brief romance the year before, Matt has returned to Lebanon to extend the relationship.

Their chemistry is just palpable. These are two damaged people, finding a refuge from their pasts in each other.

I didnt expect this play to be as brillant as it is, but it blew me away. Good writing, whether it is a book, a movie or a play stays with you, this play will stay with me for a long time.

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The Heiress- Well Worth It

Tonight I had the pleasure of seeing the latest Broadway revival of The Heiress, a theatrical reboot of the Henry James novel, Washington Square.

The story revovles around Catherine Sloper (Jessica Chastain), her father, Dr. Austin Sloper (David Straitharn) and Morris Townsend (Dan Stevens), the man who Catherine wishes to marry against her father’s wishes.

Dr. Sloper lost his wife decades ago, but still blames Catherine for his wife’s death and constantly puts her down. He believes that Morris only loves his daughter for her fortune and openly dissaproves of their marriage.

The casting of the main three characters was impeccable. Jessica Chastain plays Catherine as an intelligent young woman, stifled by her emotionally distant and demanding father. David Straitharn as Dr. Sloper is a man who loves his daughter the best way he can.  Dan Stevens plays Morris Townsend as a man who is intelligent and charming, but may have ulterior motives.

The play was riveting, I was unsure until the end if Catherine would stay with Morris or send him packing.

See it while you can.

 

 

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Desire Still Runs Hot

A Streetcar Named Desire has always been one of my favorite plays and Blanche Dubois is one of my all time favorite characters.

This past weekend, I had the pleasure of seeing the latest revival of the classic Tennessee Williams play staring Blair Underwood, Nicole Ari Parker, Daphne Rubin-Vega and Wood Harris.

Needless to say I was very happy when I walked out.

To the uninitiated, A Streetcar Named Desire is about a faded southern Belle, Blanche Dubois (Nicole Ari Parker) who comes to visit her sister, Stella (Daphne Rubin-Vega) in New Orleans. Blanche clashes with Stanley (Blair Underwood), Stella’s working class husband and is attracted to Mitch (Wood Harris), Stanley’s friend.

The play is hot and steamy and everything A Streetcar Named Desire should be. I had the pleasure of seeing the last revival several years ago with the late Natasha Richardson as Blanche and I look forward to the next revival.

The show is running on a limited engagement, I would highly reccomend seeing it.

http://streetcaronbroadway.com/

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An Excellent Dream, Too Bad I Had To Wake Up

I happen to be fan of the Bard and I am especially happy when his works are recreated in a way that is both respectful of the original vision, but still fresh to an audience.

The Classic Stage Company in New York City is currently showing a production of A Midsummer Nights until May 20th.

Leading the cast is Bebe Neuwirth in the dual roles of Hyppolita/Titania and Christina Ricci as Hermia.

The magical mixup of lovers, in both the real and fairie world was thoroughly enjoyable.

See it if you can.

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