Category Archives: Feminism

Flashback Friday-Dr. Who (1963-Present)

There is something to be said about a good science fiction story. While the story must be out of this world, it must also have human qualities for the audience to relate to.

Dr. Who has been a staple of British television since 1963. The title character is a Time Lord in human form known as the Doctor. Traveling in a spaceship known as the Tardis (which resembles a British police box on the outside), the Doctor travels through time and space with their companion(s). Along the way, the main character helps the less fortunate while encountering villains whose goal is to see to their demise.

Currently, the title character is played by Jodie Whittaker. I am not a huge Dr. Who fan, but I appreciate that this program does not take itself too seriously. This, in my opinion, allows both the audience and the characters to have fun and not take themselves too seriously.

I recommend it.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Feminism, Flashback Friday, Television, TV Review

Law & Order: SVU Character Review: Melinda Warner

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. Read at your own risk if you have not watched the show.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

In this series of weekly blog posts, I will examine character using the characters from Law & Order: Special Victims Unit to explore how writers can create fully dimensional, human characters that audiences and readers can relate to.

When it comes to criminal investigations, science may provide a clue that otherwise may remain buried. On Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, Dr. Melinda Warner (Tamara Tunie) is the medical examiner that the SVU squad turns to when all other avenues have been traveled upon.

A veteran of the Air Force, Dr. Warner is often the rational face of science when emotions and messy human behaviors prevent the detectives from closing the case.

To sum it up: when human emotion and human messiness gets in the way, science provides a way out. Dr. Warner’s knowledge and medical abilities are the logical science that works hand in hand with the humanness of crime fighting that helps to put the bad guys or girls in jail.

Leave a comment

Filed under Character Review, Feminism, New York City, Television

Why Are These Men Afraid of Greta Thunberg?

There is great power in truth. The problem is that those who fear the truth will say and do anything to keep the truth from being revealed.

Greta Thunberg is not afraid of revealing the truth about climate change and the limited time we have to prevent the destruction of our world. This I believe, deep down is what we these men are afraid of. They are also afraid because the truth comes out of a young girl who does not capitulate to them because of her sex and her age.

I’ve recently become aware of the following quote:

“You’ll never see a u-haul behind a hearse.”

Though the quote has a specific meaning, I feel like it can be applied to the reality of climate change. The reality is that our oceans are warming and rising. The glaciers are melting. The weather is becoming more extreme. Entire species of animals are either dead or dying. All of this is due to man made climate change. But there is still time, if we are willing to do what needs to be done.

What these men don’t realize is like the u-haul that goes one way when the hearse goes the other way, they are not immune from the effects of climate change. When the oceans rise and their multi-million dollar waterfront McMansions are destroyed, they will be in same boat as the rest of us.

The sooner they realize this, the better we all will be.

Leave a comment

Filed under Feminism, International News, World News

Law & Order: SVU Character Review: Dani Beck

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. Read at your own risk if you have not watched the show.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

In this series of weekly blog posts, I will examine character using the characters from Law & Order: Special Victims Unit to explore how writers can create fully dimensional, human characters that audiences and readers can relate to.

Sometimes, we have to be reminded of what and who we have to appreciate them. On Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, Dani Beck (Connie Nielsen) was Olivia Benson’s (Mariska Hargitay) temporary replacement while she was undercover.

A widow of a police officer and a cop in her own right, Beck has a different perspective on the cases they are investigating than Benson’s longtime partner, Elliot Stabler (Chris Meloni). Depending on the case, Beck either becomes too involved or becoming traumatized. It goes without saying that her inexperience in the SVU does not help her do her job.

Adding to the tension is the romantic chemistry between her and Stabler. They share a kiss, but the romance does not go beyond the kiss. After taking in an abused child who nearly burns Beck’s house down, she decides that returning to her previous position within the NYPD is best thing for her.

Note: there is usually a video in this spot, but I could not find a video that works for this post.

To sum it up: In our busy daily lives, it’s easy to take certain things and certain people for granted. It’s harder to just be grateful and appreciate who we have and what we have. Though Dani Beck is not on SVU for very long, her presence reminded fans why we loved and still love Benson and Stabler as a duo.

Leave a comment

Filed under Character Review, Feminism, New York City, Television

America’s First Daughter Book Review

They say that history is written by the victors. They may also say that history is written by those who have access to the pen. For thousands of years, men have told their stories. It is only recently that women have been given the pen and the spotlight.

America’s First Daughter was published in 2016. In the book, Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie tell the story of Martha “Patsy” Jefferson Randolph, the eldest daughter of Thomas Jefferson. The book starts when Martha, known to her family as Patsy, is a young girl. After her mother’s death, Patsy becomes her father’s companion and confidant.

When her father named as the American minister to France, Patsy travels with her father. Compared to her Virginia home, Paris is another world entirely. Growing up within the world the of pre-revolution French aristocracy, Patsy becomes suspicious of Thomas’s relationship with Sally Hemmings. She also falls in love, but this love will not turn into marriage.

After Patsy returns home, she follows the prescribed path of marriage and motherhood. But her life will not be that of the average American woman of her day. It will not only shape the lives of her family, it will shape the lives of millions of Americans.

Based in on real life letters, this book tells the story of the early days of America from the female perspective. It is a perspective that in either fiction or non fiction, is not given the attention that it should receive. I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It is well written, well researched and worth the time it takes to read.

I recommend it.

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Review, Books, Feminism, History

Law & Order SVU: Character Review: Alexandra Cabot

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. Read at your own risk if you have not watched the show.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

In this series of weekly blog posts, I will examine character using the characters from Law & Order: Special Victims Unit to explore how writers can create fully dimensional, human characters that audiences and readers can relate to.

It would be easy if life was black and white. But life is not black and white. There are shades of grey that contain complications, human failings and other stumbling blocks. On Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, DA Alexandra Cabot (Stephanie March) has a difficult job. She has to follow the law and prosecute the accused while advocating for the victims.

The moral center of the SVU, DA Cabot represents the tough choices that she and her colleagues have to make. At times, Cabot had to put aside her own feelings or slightly bend the letter of the law to ensure that the accused is found guilty and send to jail.

To sum it up: DA Cabot tries to do what is right. But sometimes doing what is right is not exactly legal or moral. In those instances, one must make a choice. As a character, fans remember her because of those shades of grey. A boring character lives in a black and white world. A human character with flaws, hopes and desires lives in a world of grey. It is that grey that brings in the audience and keeps them coming back for more.

Leave a comment

Filed under Character Review, Feminism, New York City, Television

Why I am Not Surprised About You Know Who’s Response to Cokie Roberts’s Passing?

When someone dies, the proper response is to share one’s condolences and be sympathetic to the family of the newly deceased. It is not about the person giving the condolences, it is about the person receiving the condolences.

Legendary journalist Cokie Roberts passed away this week. She was 75. Ms. Roberts was a journalist among journalists. She broke down barriers for female journalists and was the face of the news for millions of Americans.

An appropriate response to her passing is something like the statement released by former President Obama:

“Michelle and I are sad to hear about the passing of Cokie Roberts. She was a trailblazing figure; a role model to young women at a time when the profession was still dominated by men; a constant over forty years of a shifting media landscape and changing world, informing voters about the issues of our time and mentoring young journalists every step of the way. She will be missed – and we send our condolences to her family.”

Instead, the man whom we unfortunately call President, released the following statement:

“She never treated me nicely. But I would like to wish her family well. She was a professional, and I respect professionals. I respect you guys a lot, you people a lot. She was a real professional. Never treated me well, but I certainly respect her as a professional.”

Not everything is about him. Sometimes, we have to yield the spotlight to someone else. But he does not understand that. Nor does he understand or respect that the press is an integral part of a democratic country.

Just another reason to vote him out of office next fall.

Leave a comment

Filed under Feminism, National News

Thoughts On the New Brett Kavanaugh Accusations: Where There is Smoke, There is Fire

When Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed last year, his confirmation was far from smooth.

This week, new sexual assault allegations have surfaced against Justice Kavanaugh. If that was not enough, there are some who are questioning if the FBI did a thorough investigation and are calling for his impeachment.

Where there is smoke, there is fire.

From my perspective, the fact that he was still confirmed in spite of the evidence speaks to the act that powerful men can still get away with sexual assault. Women are still there just to be sexual objects.

Where there is smoke, there is fire. I have a feeling that this will not be the last time that we will be hearing about the sexual misconduct of Justice Kavanaugh.

Leave a comment

Filed under Feminism, National News, Thoughts On....

Park Avenue Summer Book Review

It’s not exactly a secret that men underestimate women. But that is often our secret to success.

Park Avenue Summer by Renee Rosen was released earlier this year. Alice Weiss is 21 in 1965, a transplant from Ohio and dreams of becoming a photographer. But like many young people who come to New York City with a dream and not much else, Alice has to get a job.

She gets a job as the secretary for the late Helen Gurley Brown, the author of Sex and the Single Girl and the new editor-in-chief of Cosmopolitan. At that time, the magazine was on it’s death bed. It was up to Helen to turn the magazine around, but it seemed to be a Herculean task. The magazine was shedding employees like a snake sheds it’s skin and the men who run the parent organization are more than ready to shut the magazine down.

When a fellow employee tries to pull Alice in into a plan to spy on her boss, Alice goes the other way. She will do everything in her power to help Helen succeed. Along the way, Alice learns a few things about life, men and success.

Described as a literary love child of The Devil Wears Prada and Mad Men, this book is more than the story of a young woman discovering herself. It is the story of an unconventional woman who succeeds in a man’s world on her own terms.

I recommend it.

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Review, Books, Feminism, History, New York City

The Winemaker’s Wife Book Review

Both love and war have a way of forever changing our worlds. When they come together, that change can span generations.

The new novel, The Winemaker’s Wife, by Kristin Harmel is set in two different time periods: World War II and 2019. In 1940, Ines and Michel are newlyweds. Michel is the owner of a prestigious champagne house Maison Chauveau. Soon after the wedding, the Germans invade. Michel starts to treat his wife as if she was his child.

Feeling angry, alone and desperate for affection, Ines makes a foolish connection with a collaborator. She is unaware of her husband’s work with the resistance and that his chef de cave‘s half Jewish wife, Celine is taking a chance by falling in love with a man who is not her husband.

In 2019, Liv’s marriage is over. When her imperious and wealthy French grandmother announces an out of the blue trip to France, Liv has no choice but to go. The trip will be nothing short of life changing.

I loved this book. The characters felt alive and real, as if I was watching a movie instead of reading a book. I loved that this book reminded me that there were good people during World War II who did not stand idly by during the Nazi occupation. They fought back with whatever means they had.

About halfway through the book, I thought I knew how it would end. But Ms. Harmel surprised me with a twist that thoroughly shocked, surprised and delighted me.

I absolutely recommend it.

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Review, Books, Feminism, History