Tag Archives: Archie Bunker

Thoughts On the Live All in the Family and The Jeffersons

Last night, ABC aired two episodes of All in the Family and The Jeffersons live.

Stepping into the iconic shoes of Archie Bunker (Carroll O’Connor) and George Jefferson (Sherman Hemsley) were Woody Harrelson and Jamie Foxx. Airing as they did in 1973 and 1975 respectively, both episodes tackled two subjects that are as difficult to talk about today as they were in the 1970’s: racism and sexism.

What I think made the live episodes so potent and so in your face is that not only to they still induce deep belly laughs, but they also force us to ask questions that can only be described as uncomfortable.

If you missed it or you would like to watch it again, the episode is available on the ABC site.

I absolutely recommend it.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under History, Television, Thoughts On....

Throwback Thursday TV Edition- All In The Family

All In The Family is an undisputed classic.

The pilot aired on January 12th, 1971. It was nothing short of earth shattering.

Archie Bunker (the late Carroll O’Connor) is a middle aged, working class World War II veteran. He lives in Queens with his loyal but slightly ditzy wife, Edith (the late Jean Stapleton), his daughter Gloria (Sally Struthers) and his liberal son in law (Rob Reiner).

Archie has opinions today that would not be considered politically correct. He does not hesitate to share those opinions, especially about those who disagree with him or those who he doesn’t like. Archie represents the generation that came of age during the depression and World War II, the generation that was middle aged with growing or grown children during the late 1960’s and early 1970’s. Despite his beliefs, Archie is still a decent guy who is trying to adapt to the changing world.

Family sitcoms before All In The Family were lovey-dovey, ooey gooey, with a teachable moment and a story line that was wrapped up neatly within 30 minutes. All In The Family changed that. The characters were flawed and human, using language that had not been heard before on American television. It exposed the raw nerve that was the American culture in that period. After 40+ years, this show is still relevant and still funny.

Leave a comment

Filed under Throwback Thursday, TV Review