Tag Archives: Benedict Cumberbatch

Interesting Interview Technique

It takes a certain amount confidence to go on a job interview. Convincing someone to hire you based on a half hour conversation is not easy, by any stretch of the imagination.

Last night I saw the Imitation Game.

Alan Turing (Benedict Cumberbatch) has been summoned for a job interview. It is not just any job interview. If he is offered the job, he will be part of a exclusive and secret team whose sole responsibility is to break the Enigma code that the Nazis are using.

When Mr. Turing meets with Commander Denniston (Charles Dance), he tells Commander Denniston that he needs Alan more than Alan needs him.

That takes balls, to put it bluntly. Telling a potential employer that they need you more than you need them is risky. When interviewing, the person being interviewed should be confident, but not to the point of being arrogant. But considering the job and the circumstances that Mr. Turing is in, that kind of statement makes sense.

Would I recommend using those exact words in that exact sentence when interviewing for a job? Probably not, but the idea is a good one. But there is a way to present yourself in a such a manner to a potential employer that tells them that they need you more than you need them.

 

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The Imitation Game Movie Review

Alan Turing, to say the least, was a complicated man. A gay man in an era when being gay was a criminal offense, Alan Turing was a smart outsider who never quite fit in. He was also the man who created the modern computer and helped the Allies to win World War II.

Released late last year, The Imitation Game is the story of how Turing and his associates were able to break the Nazi code.

Taking on the lead role, Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) brings to life the film’s complicated and later on tragic lead character. Co-starring Keira Knightley (Pride and Prejudice) Matthew Goode (Death Comes To Pemberley), Rory Kinnear, Allen Leech (Downton Abbey), Matthew Beard, Mark Strong (Emma) and Charles Dance, this movie is incredible and so is it’s leading man. This smart,  well made and extremely entertaining film deserves any and all praise that it receives.

This is one of the best movies that I have seen so far this year. I highly, highly, recommend it.

 

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Filed under Emma, Movie Review, Movies, Pride and Prejudice

Small Island Book And Movie Review

World War II was a game changer in multiple ways.

For those who lived in the former British colonies, they hoped that the motherland would provide them with opportunities that they did not have at home.

Some would be sorely disappointed.

Andrea Levy’s novel, Small Island, focuses on four distinct characters, two of whom hope that World War II has opened doors for them.

In 1948, Hortense Joseph leaves Jamaica for London. Her husband, Gilbert, joined the British army and finds that after the war, despite his service, he is considered to be second class due to his skin color. Gilbert’s white landlady, Queenie is living with her father in law while her husband, Bernard is away, fighting for king and country. But when he returns from the war, Bernard is suffering from unresolved issues from the war.

In 2009, Small Island was made into a TV movie starring Naomi Harris as Hortense, David Oyelowo as Gilbert, Ruth Wilson as Queenie and Benedict Cumberbatch as Bernard.

I enjoyed both the book and the television adaptation. It sheds light on a subject that many are unaware of.  While the American civil rights movement in the 1960’s and 1970’s has become mythic in it’s own right, it is less known outside of Britain of the lives of it’s former colonists and their struggle to equality, acceptance and opportunities in the motherland.

I recommend both.

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The Oscar Goes To….. 12 Years A Slave

If I were a betting woman, I would say that 12 Years A Slave will  not be at a loss for nominations and awards come  award season.

It is a brilliant piece of film making that brings the crime of slavery to life in such a way that is as real and raw as if the viewer lived that life.

Based on the book of the same name written in 1853, the movie tells the story of Solomon Northup (Chiwetel Ejiofor) is a free black man living with his family in Saratoga, NY in 1841.  Under the guise of a business trip, he travels with two men to Washington DC who drug him, kidnap him and sell him into slavery.

His first master, Ford (Benedict Cumberbatch) is as sympathetic as he can be.  But his next master, Edwin Epps (Michael Fassbender) is a cruel man with a jealous wife (Sarah Paulson) who is obsessed and infatuated with a fellow slave, Patsey (Lupita Nyong’o).

With the arrival of Bass (Brad Pitt) Solomon sees what might be his way out of slavery.

This movie, despite being just over 2 hours, is incredible. Most American adults and children over the age of about 10 have been taught about African-American slavery.  It’s one thing to learn about it in a history book, but it is another thing to watch the brutal and violent honesty of the subject on screen.

I predict nominations, if not for the movie in general for Fassbender and Ejiofor.

 

 

 

 

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