Tag Archives: Carey Mulligan

My Grandparent’s War Review

The past has much to teach us, if we are willing to listen.

The new four part miniseries, My Grandparent’s War premiered last night on PBS. This four part series follows four prominent British actors as they learn about what their grandparents went through during World War II. In the first episode, Helena Bonham Carter explores wartime experiences of her paternal grandmother Helen Violet Bonham Carter and her maternal grandfather Eduardo Propper de Callejón. The next three episodes tell the family histories of Mark Rylance, Carey Mulligan, and Kristin Scott Thomas.

I truly enjoyed the program. If nothing else, it was just a reminder that that more things change, the more they stay the same. The generation that lived through and survived World War II will soon be gone from this Earth. It is therefore, incumbent upon us to hear their stories in whatever form we can.

Do I recommend it? Absolutely.

My Grandparent’s War airs on Sunday night at 8PM on PBS.

Leave a comment

Filed under History, Television, TV Review

The Dig Movie Review

From the outside looking it, archeology may appear to be akin to an Indiana Jones movie. But anyone with any amount of knowledge of this subject will tell you otherwise.

The Dig premiered yesterday on Netflix. As World War II rumbles in the distance in 1939, Basil Brown (Ralph Fiennes) is a self trained and unorthodox archeologist. He has been hired by Edith Pretty (Carey Mulligan) to excavate her land and see if he can find buried historical treasure. What he discovers will be known as Sutton Hoo, an Anglo-Saxon burial ship rich in previously unknown artefacts. But with war on the horizon and Basil’s expertise questioned, it looks as if the ship and her objects will remain buried.

I wanted to like this movie. The premise seemed interesting and the cast is stellar. It is a BPD (British Period Drama) with a narrative that is unusual for the genre. The problem is that I was bored, whatever promises that were made in the trailer did not come to fruition.

Do I recommend it? No.

The Dig is available for streaming on Netflix.

1 Comment

Filed under History, Movie Review, Movies, Netflix

Throwback Thursday-Shame (2011)

Life can feel pretty empty sometimes. We may appear to have it all, but underneath, something is missing. Instead of going after what is missing, the easiest thing to do is compensate for the emptiness inside of us.

In the 2011 movie, Shame, Brandon (Michael Fassbender) lives and works in New York City. Over the years, he has cultivated the image of a polished, mature, respectable citizen. But underneath that image is a sex addict who knows how to hide in plain sight. Then his sister, Sissy (Carey Mulligan) re-enters his life and his apartment and Brandon’s mask begins to crumble.

I originally wanted to see this movie because Michael Fassbender is one of my favorite actors. When I walked out of the movie theater, I was floored. Fassbender’s performance is of a tortured soul trying to keep his urges under control. Mulligan, as Brandon’s younger sister, is fighting her own demons while adding to her brother’s demons. While this movie is not for kids, it is worth watching.

I recommend it.

Leave a comment

Filed under Life, Movie Review, Movies, New York City, Throwback Thursday

Far From The Madding Crowd Review

Literature is filled with tales of life, romance, drama and marriage.

Thomas Hardy’s 1874 novel, Far From The Madding Crowd is about all of the above. Add in a strong, complicated and thoroughly human heroine in Bathsheba Everdene and you have a novel that stands out in a sea of classics. The latest adaptation of the novel premiered in May.

Bathsheba Everdene (Carey Mulligan) is a unique young woman. She has just inherited her recently deceased uncle’s farm. In addition to now being an heiress and a landowner, Bathsheba has received attention and/or marriage proposals from three distinct men.  Gabriel Oak (Matthias Schoenaerts) is the John Wayne of the three suitors: nearly silent, strong and steady. Sergeant Francis Troy (Tom Sturridge) is the army officer who looks good in uniform, but may turn out to be a flash in the pan.  William Boldwood (Michael Sheen) would be the standard choice of a husband for a woman like Bathsheba. William is older, has a large home, a large piece of land and a steady income to his name.

Bathsheba is determined to remain single. But with such an array of men to choose from, remaining single may not happen.

I tried to read the book, but I could not get through it. So, to be fair, this review is strictly based on this adaptation. Carey Mulligan has proved once again why she is one the best young actresses around. Classy, intelligent and always choosing to play a variety of characters, I predict that Ms. Mulligan will do very well come award season. Among the co-stars that play her would be husbands, Matthias Schoenaerts is the newest BPD (British Period Drama) hottie on the block. Tom Sturridge as Sergeant Troy is the Wickham (harking back to the 2005 Pride and Prejudice, where Ms. Mulligan played Kitty Bennet) of FFTMC. He is handsome, says pretty things, and looks good in the uniform, but there isn’t much else to him. Michael Sheen, as William Boldwood is the standard choice for the heroine, but Bathsheba Everdene is not the standard literary heroine.

I recommend this movie.

Far From The Madding Crowd is presently in theaters. 

1 Comment

Filed under Books, Feminism, Movie Review, Movies, Pride and Prejudice

Throwback Thursday Part II- An Education

When we are young, we can’t wait to grow up. And then when we grow up…… and we find out that it’s not all that we thought it was.

An Education made it’s debut in 2009. It’s the story of Jenny (Carey Mulligan), a teenager in 1960’s London. Her father (Alfred Molina) has a goal of seeing his daughter receive her college degree from Oxford.  Her life changes when she meets David G0ldman (Peter Saarsgard), a man twice her age. David is very much the gentleman, to Jenny and her parents. Their relationship begins to turn romantic, but David may not be what he seems.

This movie is a very quiet movie, but in that quietness is the power.  Mulligan as teenage Jenny, represents the anxieties and pressures we all faced as teenagers. Molina, as Jenny’s father represents all our fathers when we were teenagers. He wants the best for her, but still does what every father of a teenager girl does. Saarsgard as David, represents the fantasy of being a teenager and taken away from the restrictive life to the freedom of being an adult.

This cast is full of actors who have played characters in Austen adaptations, with a Jane Eyre subplot.

What else does one need for a good movie?

Leave a comment

Filed under Jane Austen, Jane Eyre, Movie Review, Movies, Throwback Thursday