Tag Archives: Civil Rights movement

John Lewis Will Always be Twice the Man You Know Who Is

When the late Congressman John Lewis died almost two weeks ago, America was reminded of what a hero truly looks like.

In the past, when an American such as Congressman Lewis dies, the President is front and center at the memorial service.

You know who chose not to pay respects to the late Congressman.

The difference between you know and Congressman Lewis is that Congress Lewis was an American hero who exemplified selflessness. He was front and center in the Civil Rights marches of the 1960’s, putting his life on the line for the rights and freedoms of others.

I would be thoroughly shocked if you know who did anything for anyone else besides himself.

RIP John Lewis. Your contribution to American history will live forever.

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Filed under National News, Politics

RIP John Lewis

In tough times, it is easy to hang back and pretend as if everything is normal. It is much harder to stand up and fight for what you believe in.

Congressman and Civil Rights leader John Lewis passed away yesterday. He was 80 years old.

Born in 1940 to sharecropper parents in Alabama, segregation was part and parcel of the world he grew up in. In the early 1960’s, he joined the Civil Rights movement and was one of the original Freedom Riders. Twenty five years later, he was elected to Congress. On both sides of the political aisle, he was one of the most respected men to have walked through the halls of power.

If there was ever a textbook definition of an American hero, John Lewis’s picture would be front and center. He knew what he believed in and fought for those beliefs, even when victory seemed nearly impossible. As both a Civil Rights leader and a member of Congress, he taught all of what strength and courage look like.

May his memory be a blessing and an inspiration to us all.

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Filed under History, National News, Politics

Black Antisemitism: Fight the Real Enemy

Racism of any kind is a disease. It blinds us to see the humanity of others, forcing us to judge someone solely on one aspect of their character or identity.

Over the last week or so, there have been headlines that state that certain African-American celebrities using their platform to spout antisemitic lies. One of these celebrities in Nick Cannon.

I have two very specific thoughts about this topic, which is making my stomach turn.

The first is that the people who are spouting these lies are ignorant. They aren’t stupid, but they are ignorant. One does not have the career longevity in Hollywood that Cannon has by being stupid.

What is sadly sometimes forgotten is that American Jews worked hand in hand with African-Americans in the fight for equality during the Civil Rights era. I wish Cannon and those who think like him would have done their research before opening their mouths or going to their keyboards.

The second is that we have a common enemy. They are called the alt-right. In their ideal world, America is a Christian, Caucasian, and Heterosexual nation. Anyone who does not fit into those categories is therefore, not allowed to be an American.

If America is to become the ideals written down in our founding documents, we have to put our differences aside and remember what we have in common. If we don’t, then we will never become what we say we are.

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RIP Katherine Johnson

History is not always made by the big names that are in the headlines. It is sometimes made by those who are not in the spotlight.

In the 1960’s, the Space Race was heating up. It was also a time of change in America. The Civil Rights movement forced the country to face it’s shameful past of denying human and legal rights to the African-American community.

Katherine Johnson may not have known it at the time, but she had a role to play in changing America for the better. Mrs. Johnson passed away today at the age of 101.

In her day, she was automatically disqualified for certain jobs because she was a woman and a citizen of color. But when push came to shove, her mathematical abilities overcame those barriers and helped America go into space for the first time.

After decades of silence, she was finally given her due in the 2016 film, Hidden Figures. She was played on screen by Taraji P. Henson.

May her memory be a blessing and an inspiration.

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Filed under Feminism, History, Movies

Thoughts on MLK Day and the Spike in Antisemitism

For many Americans, Martin Luther King Jr. is an icon. More than fifty years after his death, he is the image of the Civil Rights Movement.

These days, the news is unfortunately full of stories of attacks against Jewish residents in the New York City area by African-Americans.

When asked about the Jews and antisemitism, Dr. King said the following:

“When people criticize Zionists, they mean Jews. You’re talking anti-Semitism.”

What many forget is that American Jews were on the forefront of the Civil Rights moment.

Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel was not only a good friend of Dr. King, he was an ally. He was on the front lines with Dr. King, fighting for the rights of African-Americans.

In 1964, three young men were murdered because they believed that all Americans, regardless of race, were equal. James Chaney was the son of a African-American family from Mississippi. Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner were raised Jewish in the New York City area. They came together and were murdered together because of what they believed and what they were fighting for.

When I think about Martin Luther King Jr., I think of a man of courage, honor and conviction. He knew that the journey and others were about embark upon was dangerous. But he also knew that it was right. I take that as a lesson not just in my personal life, but in every aspect of my life. What is right is not always easy. But in that lack of ease comes the knowledge that though the journey is difficult, it is the only way forward.

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Filed under History, New York City

RIP Elijah Cummings

It has been said that true courage comes not from the absence of fear, but rising above the fear.

Rep Elijah Cummings (D-Maryland) passed away yesterday. He was 68. The chair of the House Oversight Committee, he was born in Baltimore in 1951 to former sharecroppers.

Coming of age during the Civil Rights era, he is an icon of the movement and a time when African-Americans were fighting for their most basic rights. As an adult, he first became a lawyer and then went into politics. Recently, he was known for going up against you know who and defending the reputation of his hometown.

It’s hard to find a politician who is as principled, honorable and respectful of this country as Rep Cummings. He set a standard not just for our era, but for the future of what American politics should look like.

May his memory be a blessing.

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Let the People See: The Story of Emmett Till Book Review

It is a sad and disgusting reality of American life that young men of color are often falsely accused of crimes simply due to their skin color. While this may appear to be a new phenomenon, it is an old and heartbreaking reality that Americans of color have been dealing with for many generations.

Emmett Till is not the first, nor has been the last young man of color to be targeted because of his skin color.

The new book, Let the People See: The Story of Emmett Till, by Elliott J. Gorn, tells the story of young Mr. Till’s brief life, the accusations that led to his murder and the societal tinderbox that his murder created. In the summer of 1955, Emmett Till was 14 years old. Born and raised in Chicago, he was spending summer vacation with his family in Mississippi. He was killed by two white men who believed that he had whistled at one of the men’s wives. The murder led to a trial that helped to spark the Civil Rights Movement. In addition to reviewing the information that was available to law enforcement over sixty years ago, the author also examines evidence that only came to the surface in 2005. Combining both new information and old, the question is, what can we, as modern Americans learn from our predecessors mistakes so that there are no more Emmett Tills in the future?

Reading this book made me angry and sad at the same time. It made me angry because a young life was taken for no reason other than being in the wrong place at the wrong time. It made me sad because this same sh*t is still happening 63 years later.  Written with intense details and very readable, this book I believe is a must read for all Americans. If we are to live in the just and free society that we claim to have, must face our demons and be willing to look our collective past in the face. This includes the murder of Emmett Till.

I absolutely recommend it.

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RIP Stan Lee

Comic books are sometimes dismissed as violent, sexual, immature and not fit for the eyes of its young readers. But comic book can also reach its readers in a way that few genres can. Today the comic book genre lost one of its brightest stars and iconic creators, Stan Lee.

Mr. Lee was born in 1922 to Jewish immigrants who were originally from Romania. In his teens, he started working at Timely Comics, which would decades later become Marvel Comics. After fighting for his country in World War II,  Mr. Lee returned creating comic books. Instead of introducing readers to variations of the same characters they had seen previously, he started creating characters that were not just misfits, but also fully fleshed out as human beings.

Readers fell in love with  immortal characters such as Spider-Man, Black Panther, the Fantastic Four and X-Men. While they were reading about superheroes who were going on out of this world adventures, they were also hopefully opening their minds to those were being disenfranchised because they were different. In a very subtle manner, the Feminist Movement, the Civil rights movement and other movements whose goal of enfranchisement of those who rights have been taken away or non-existent benefited from the characters whose stories are told within these comic books.

In the words of our mutual ancestors, may the memory of Stan Lee be a blessing not just to his loved ones, but to the millions of fans who have adored his creations over the years.

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Filed under Books, Feminism, History, Movies, New York City

Thoughts On The 50th Anniversary Of The Assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.

50 years ago today, Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated as he stood on a hotel balcony in Memphis, Tennessee.

He was not the first person to lead the Civil Rights movement, but he was one of the most iconic and most vocal in the fight for equality.

While he was an imperfect human being, he was a perfect leader. He spoke to everyone who saw the injustice being done to the African-American community and were willing to take a public stand against that injustice.

His “I have a dream speech” is as resonant in 2018 as it was in 1963.

Decades later, we remember and respect Dr. King for everything that he did and still does for those who feel disenfranchised. His physical body maybe gone, but his words and his legacy continue to live on.

May his memory continue to be a blessing and may we one day live up to the ideals that he fought and died for.

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RIP Harper Lee

Harper Lee passed away today.

Best known for writing the modern classic that is To Kill A Mockingbird, she was revered as of the best American writers of the last few decades.

One of the popular words of wisdom that is passed around to writers is “write what you know”. Ms. Lee based her book on the world she knew and incident from her childhood. To Kill A Mockingbird is the story of a young girl named Scout. Her father, Atticus Finch is lawyer whose newest client is Tom Robinson, an African-American man who has been accused of raping a white woman.

In 1962, at the height of the Civil Rights movement, a film version of the book was released with Gregory Peck in the role of Atticus Finch.

Last year, an unpublished draft of Go Set A Watchman, an early draft of what would become To Kill A Mockingbird was printed with protest from the author.

There are many writers (myself included) whose life long wish is to see their novel in stores. But to have your novel live on long after your bones have returned to the dust is the ultimate dream.

RIP Harper Lee.

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