Where the Crawdads Sing Movie Review

*This review is solely based on the movie. I have not read the book yet.

Rumors are powerful. Regardless of whether or not they are truthful, they have a way of developing a life of their own.

Where the Crawdads Sing is a new movie based on the book of the same name by Delia Owens. Set in 1969 in the South, Kya Clark (Daisy Edgar-Jones) has been on her own since she was a child. Growing up in the woods, she is known in town as “the marsh girl”. Though she is independent and able to take care of herself, a part of her yearns for love and acceptance.

When Kya’s ex-boyfriend, Chase Andrews (Harris Dickinson) is found dead, the finger is pointed at Kya. Defending her is local lawyer Tom Milton (David Strathairn). The film flicks back and forth from the present to the past. Included in Kya’s past is her first love, Tate Walker (Taylor John Smith).

This film is really good. The whodunit aspect of the narrative kept me on tenterhooks. Kya is the type of heroine who is likable, human, and an outsider. That outsiderness is what made me want to follow her story and understand the choices she makes.

The visuals are fantastic. The beauty of nature and the animals that make up the world around us were front and center, adding layers and a character that is both touchable and distant.

The only issue I have is the characterizations of Mabel (Michael Hyatt) and Jumpin’ (Sterling Macer Jr.). They own the local general store and are one of the few allies that Kya has. The problem is that they are the only people of color in the film and unfortunately falls into the magical negro category.

Produced by Reese Witherspoon, this movie is one of the best this year. It is a slow burn that made me question if I knew the whole story until the very end.

Do I recommend it? Yes.

Where the Crawdads Sing is presently showing in theaters.

A League of Their Own Character Review: Walter Harvey

*The schedule for the Character Review posts will be changing to Friday (or Saturday at the latest from now on).

*I apologize for not posting last weekend. There is only so much that can be done in a day.

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the movie A League of Their Own. Read at your own risk if you have not watched the movie. There is something to be said about a well-written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front of us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

When a businessperson starts a new venture, the outcome is unknown. The only objective is to increase the bottom line. In A League of Their Own, Walter Harvey (Garry Marshall) is the CEO of a candy company. With the men away fighting in World War II, he sees an opportunity in helping to establish the AAGPBL. Though he sees an economic opportunity, he does not know that he is creating an important crack in the glass ceiling.

When the teams are not doing as well as hoped, Walter and the other owners want to fold. But Ira Lowenstein (David Strathairn) sees its potential and takes over running the organization, creating the success that the original owners could not see.

Starts at 3:39

Walter is both a man of his time and a CEO whose job is to keep his company open. He cannot understand or see that what he is doing is opening the door for future generations of women to spread their wings.

Which is why he is a memorable character.

This will be my last character review post for A League of Their Own. Come back next weekend to find out the next set of characters that I will be reviewing,

A League of Their Own Character Review: Ira Lowenstein

*The schedule for the Character Review posts will be changing to Friday (or Saturday at the latest from now on).

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the movie A League of Their Own. Read at your own risk if you watched the movie. There is something to be said about a well-written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front of us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

The key to any successful business is marketing. The product or service can be the best thing since sliced bread, but without the buying public being aware of it, success is unlikely to happen. In A League of Their Own, Ira Lowenstein (David Strathairn) is the man behind the appeal of the AAGPBL. When his boss, Walter Harvey (Garry Marshall) wants to close down the league due to the lack of an audience, it is Ira who keeps it alive. But, like any businessman, the cold truth of the bottom line counteracts the personal relationships of its employees. When Dottie Hinson (Geena Davis) becomes a star, that spotlight adds to the long-simmering tension with her younger sister, Kit Keller (Lori Petty).

To sum it up: It takes vision, drive, and belief to make it in the business world. This is especially true when an idea is new, untested, and the response from the public is not what it was expected to be. What makes Ira special is that he believes in the players, even when it contradicts the ideals of the period and is not bringing in the expected profit.

Which is why he is a memorable character.

The Heiress- Well Worth It

Tonight I had the pleasure of seeing the latest Broadway revival of The Heiress, a theatrical reboot of the Henry James novel, Washington Square.

The story revovles around Catherine Sloper (Jessica Chastain), her father, Dr. Austin Sloper (David Straitharn) and Morris Townsend (Dan Stevens), the man who Catherine wishes to marry against her father’s wishes.

Dr. Sloper lost his wife decades ago, but still blames Catherine for his wife’s death and constantly puts her down. He believes that Morris only loves his daughter for her fortune and openly dissaproves of their marriage.

The casting of the main three characters was impeccable. Jessica Chastain plays Catherine as an intelligent young woman, stifled by her emotionally distant and demanding father. David Straitharn as Dr. Sloper is a man who loves his daughter the best way he can.  Dan Stevens plays Morris Townsend as a man who is intelligent and charming, but may have ulterior motives.

The play was riveting, I was unsure until the end if Catherine would stay with Morris or send him packing.

See it while you can.

 

 

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