Married… With Children Character Review: Peg Bundy

*The schedule for the Character Review posts will be changing to Friday (or Saturday at the latest from now on).

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television show Married… With Children. Read at your own risk if you have not watched the show. There is something to be said about a well-written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front of us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

The image of the classic sitcom housewife is as follows: she cleans her house, takes care of her children and husband, cooks delicious meals, dispenses advice, and does with a smile on her face. There is little in the way of unhappiness or wanting more. Peg Bundy (Katey Sagal) is the exact opposite of this vision of maternal perfection. She can’t cook to save her life, her house is a mess, her children are undisciplined, and she mocks her husband Al (Ed O’Neill) for the fun of it.

Knocked up by Al in high school, their wedding was far from a grand, romantic affair. Instead of being wise with the income that comes in from her husband’s job, she picks his pockets frequently and dresses in a way that some might view as inappropriate for a mother. When her kids are in school and Al is at work, Peg can be found on the living room couch, feigning housework, watching daytime TV, and stuffing her face.

But for all of her crassness and lack of caring, Peg does her best, in her own way. She is loyal to her husband and is raising the next generation the best way she knows how to.

Donna Reed, Peg is not. But in going against type, she reflects the everyday woman, even if her character is exaggerated. Real-life is complicated, as we all know. So are marriage and being a parent. It is those complications that make her unique, interesting, and forever funny.

Which is why she is a memorable character.

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Thoughts On the Ellen Show Controversy, Mental Illness, and Toxic Workplaces

Anyone who has been in the working world for enough time would easily be able to list the issues they have with their current job or had with previous jobs. But there is difference between the average complaint and a toxic workplace.

Actress and comedian Ellen DeGeneres has hosted her own talk show for the last 17 years. A mainstay of daytime TV, Ellen comes off as the best friend the audience wish they could have. But recently, the reputation of the show and it’s namesake has been tarred by complaints of mistreatment of behind the scenes staff.

As of Friday, three of the program’s producers were fired and Ellen has since apologized.

Working in a toxic environment is akin to psychological torture. Logically, you know that you need the paycheck and the benefits that come with the job. But, at a certain point, it becomes a question of whether or not it is worth your mental health to continue at a job in which you are seen as worthless and incapable.

Over the past few years, the subject of mental health has become a topic that has come to the forefront. I’ve spoken many times on this blog about the importance of being mentally healthy and physically healthy. Part of that is feeling respected and appreciated at work.

Unfortunately, this will not be the first company, nor will this be the last company to create a less than ideal working environment for their staff. I just hope that this is a lesson on how not to treat your staff.

Throwback Thursday-The View (1997-Present)

It’s boring when we are around the same people who have the same beliefs. Life is much more interesting when we are around people whose beliefs and viewpoints are different from ours.

The View premiered on ABC in 1997 and since then, has become a staple of the network’s morning schedule. Created by journalism legend Barbara Walters, the premise of the show was to bring in five different women of varying ages, backgrounds and opinions to discuss the latest headlines and interview prominent figures. Joining Barbara at the table for the first few years was Meredith Vieira, Star Jones, Joy Behar and Debbie Matenopoulos. Over the years, the women around the table have changed (except for Behar), but the voices of the diverse women coming together remains the same.

I’m not a fan of Daytime TV. I find it sometimes to be rather boring. But, on the rare occasion when I am home on a weekday, I will watch The View. I find the conversation to be interesting and the differing perspectives of the hosts a refreshing take on the us vs. them mentality that has become part of our national discourse.

I recommend it.

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