Tag Archives: Douglas Booth

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies Casting News

The casting for the upcoming movie adaptation of Pride and Prejudice and Zombies is as follows (so far):

  • Mr. Collins (Matt Smith, Dr. Who)
  • Mr. Bingley (Douglas Booth, Romeo and Juliet)
  • Elizabeth Bennet (Lily James, Downton Abbey)
  • Mr. Wickham (Jack Huston, Boardwalk Empire)
  • Mr. Darcy (Sam Riley, Malificent)
  • Jane or Lydia Bennet???? (Bella Heathcote, Dark Shadows)****- IMDB does not specify who she is playing, but but my guess is either Jane or Lydia.
  • Caroline Bingley (Emma Greenwell, True Blood)

Bear in mind that not all of the casting has been announced. I’m still ambivalent about Sam Riley as Mr. Darcy, but only time will tell.  Overall, I am extremely pleased with the casting and will be very happy to sit in a dark movie theater and watch the Bennet sisters kick some zombie a$$.

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Filed under Books, Jane Austen, Movies, Pride and Prejudice, William Shakespeare

Noah, The Flood That Did Could Have Been

The story of Noah is familiar one. Noah was told by G-d that he was going to create a flood to rid the world of those who had sinned. But Noah and his family would be saved by building an ark which would hold the world’s animals. After some time floating on the endless ocean, a dove was sent to Noah, a sign that that would waters would recede and land would soon be found.

Biblical epics have been a staple of Hollywood storytelling since it’s early days.   Transferring the story of Noah from the pages of the Bible to big screen would have happened eventually.

Directed by Darren Aronofsky,  co written by Aronosky and Ari Handel, Noah (Russell Crowe) is the descendant of Seth, the third son of Adam and Eve. He and his wife Naamah (Jennifer Connelly) have three sons. Shem (played as an adult by Douglas Booth), Ham (played by as an adult by Logan Lerman) and Japheth (played by as an adolescent by Leo McHugh Caroll). When Noah is given a message by G-d that the  flood is coming, he seeks out his grandfather, Methusaleh (Anthony Hopkins), for guidance.  During their journey, they find Ila, a orphan (played by as an adult by Emma Watson) who becomes their adopted daughter and the Watchers, fallen angels who become their helpers in building the ark.  But trouble comes in the form of Tubal-cain (Ray Winstone), a self proclaimed king who wants the ark for himself.

When making a biblical movie, Hollywood will inevitably come up against two barriers: the first being that the movie will never be universally approved, there will always be criticism. The second is that biblical characters, like mythical characters are often larger than life. We, as the audience know their story, but we do not know them as human beings, which allows the filmmakers creative license. That creative license may create controversy when a religious movie goer may disapprove of on screen depiction of the story and the characters.

One of the best elements of the movie was the strong female characters. With a rare exception, most of the women in the Bible referred to as the wife of ______ or the daughter of _______. She is not named, nor are we told anything about her other than she is someone’s wife or daughter. Naamah and Ila are both very strong and capable female characters, they are equal to the men as integral parts of the story.

The movie build up a steady pace up to the flood and then the problems start. The third act of the movie, when they are stuck on the ark, I had problems with. Frankly, that part of the movie could have been shorter, shortening the entire movie. Noah is not a bad movie,  but if I were the screen writer, I would written the third act differently.

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A Romeo And Juliet Review- This Rose Does Not Smell As Sweet

I heard once that when writing a script, whether is for stage or screen, the single key to the project’s success or failure success or failure is the script.

William Shakespeare, in all of the years that he wrote and with all of the plays he wrote, never wrote a bad play.  Romeo and Juliet is one of his most famous works.  It has been adapted countless times over the years and has been a staple of an English teachers curriculum for generations.

Anyone who had read my blog knows that Downton Abbey is one of my favorite television. As far as  I am concerned, Julian Fellows can do no wrong as a  TV writer (though some of the story lines in season 2 are a bit questionable, which is another topic for another time).  That being said, and please pardon my French, Julian Fellows, what the f*ck did you do to Romeo and Juliet?

I cannot blame the cast. Romeo (Douglas Booth) and Juliet (Hailee Steinfeld) are both age appropriate and have reasonable chemistry, in addition to having the proper amount of romantic teenage angst.  Ed Westwick, as Tybalt plays his part very well.  Juliet’s parents, Lord Capulet (Damien Lewis) and Lady Capulet (Natascha  McElhone) are well played, along with the rest of the cast.

The problem, itself, is in the screen play. Some scenes are missing and some have been added.  The fact that it was filmed on location in Verona does provide a sense of reality.  It was a valiant effort on the part of the filmmakers, but unfortunately, the movie fell short of my expectations.

The next time I want to see Romeo and Juliet, I will either watch the 1968 movie or the 1996 movie.

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Filed under Movie Review, Reviews, William Shakespeare