Hoarder House Flippers Review

There is an old saying:

You can’t judge a book by its cover.

Though this phrase is usually used when referring to people, it can also be applied to property. In the world of home renovation, when the average person sees trouble, a flipper sees possibility.

The new Hulu home renovation show, Hoarder House Flippers, takes this concept to the nth degree. The program follows three teams of flippers who buy homes that have a double negative against them: they are in need of desperate repair and formerly owned by hoarders. The goal is to fix up properties and sell them for maximum profit. Along the way (which is par for the course), there will be unforeseen problems and disagreements.

I admire the people who take on projects like this. It takes guts and creativity to see through the mess and the challenge. Though this show is thoroughly predictable, what I take away from it is the vision of a home that needs a family to fill it with love and memories.

Do I recommend it? Yes.

Hoarder House Flippers are available for streaming on Hulu.

Flashback Friday: Love It or Lose It (2004-2006)

When deciding to redecorate your home, it is sometimes forgotten that this choice is a risk. Though the designer will lay out their vision with the customer, the image presented may not match the final product.

Love It or Lose It (2004-2006) was an early entry in the reality television home renovation show subgenre. Hosted by Tamara Taggart, the subjects of each episode are presented by three designers. Upon making their selection, the homeowners have no say in what will be done to their property. When the work is done and the result is presented, they have two choices. They can either accept it or ask that it be undone.

What I liked about this reality show is the twist. But at the end of the day, the predictability got to me. I can only watch so many episodes before I have to either turn off the tv or change the channel.

Do I recommend it? Maybe.

Throwback Thursday: Nate & Jeremiah by Design (2017-Present)

The balance between our work lives and our personal lives is, well, a balancing act. Sometimes, priorities have been shifted around to be productive.

Nate and Jeremiah by Design have been part of the TLC lineup since 2017. Designers Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent are life partners and business partners. While raising their children and maintaining their marriage, their job is to help homeowners whose home renovation projects did not go as planned.

I respect the fact that we get a glimpse into their private lives. I also appreciate the representation of the LGBTQ community that is still sadly lacking on television. However, the narrative is rote as the genre goes. After a certain point, I have to change the channel. I can only take so much before I get bored.

Do I recommend it? Maybe.

Flashback Friday: Animal Cribs (2017-2019)

When it comes to our pets, we love them as if they were our own children.

Animal Cribs aired on Animal Planet from 2017 to 2019. Antonio Ballatore is both a respected designer and an animal lover. This reality show followed Antonio and his team as they renovated the client’s homes to fit the needs of the humans and the nonhumans who called the property home.

I enjoyed this program when it was on the air. It was an interesting take on what could have been standard for this genre. I loved the passion that Ballatore had for not only his work, but for the creatures who would call his creations home.

Do I recommend it? Yes.

Throwback Thursday: Hidden Potential (2017-2019)

The design of one’s home is a personal decision. It can be simple, out there, or somewhere in between.

The HGTV series, Hidden Potential, was on the air from 2017 to 2019. Meeting with a new homeowner every week, designer Jasmine Roth transforms each property according to the needs of the owner(s). Along the way, there may be a few bumps in the road. By the end of the episode, the building is as unique as the people who call it home.

The narrative of the program is standard for the genre. As much as I appreciate the show, it was merely ok. It comes down to the question of how many episodes you can watch before the repetitiveness becomes too much.

Do I recommend it? Maybe.

Flip or Flop: Fort Worth (2017-2018)

Getting into real estate as a profession is a gamble. The potential of earning more than a reasonable income is more than compelling. But, the risk is that if things go south, those involved could lose their shirt.

Flip or Flop: Fort Worth aired on HGTV from 2017-2018. A Texas offshoot of the original California-based series, the show follows married couple and military veterans Andy and Ashley Williams as they buy, renovate, and sell run-down houses. As with every show within this genre, there are always problems and the possibility of not being able to sell the finished product is always there in the background.

Unfortunately, some shows are not meant to last. As much as I enjoyed it, my opinion was not enough to keep it on the air for more than a year.

Do I recommend it? Yes.

Throwback Thursday: This Old House (1979-Present)

When we watch home renovation shows, it appears that the process is quick and easy with very little stress. The truth is that it is a process that is time consuming, expensive, and riddled with potential problems.

This Old House has been part of the PBS schedule since 1979. The OG of this genre of television, it was originally hosted by Bob Vila. The program follows the craftspeople as they rebuild a house that appears to be past its prime. Unlike other shows of this nature, it is informational and takes multiple episodes, if not an entire season to give the building new life.

While other reality shows that also focus on property restoration are flashy and Hollywood-ized, This Old House is down to earth. It may come off as boring, but I would wager that someone who is interested in this topic would the show fascinating.

Do I recommend it? Maybe.

Bargain Block Review

Anyone in the world of real estate can tell you that having one long standing empty property on a street brings the value of the entire block down. Multiply that by many streets in a neighborhood and a city and that is much bigger issue to contend with.

On the new HGTV series, Bargain Block, the audience follows Keith Bynum and Evan Thomas as they bring Detroit back to life by buying run down homes, renovating them, and then selling at an affordable price.

Starts at :19

Though the format is standard for this channel and this genre, I like that Keith and Evan are giving back to the community instead of just running a business.

Do I recommend it? Yes.

Bargain Block airs on HGTV on Wednesdays at 9PM.

No Demo Reno Review

Anyone who is fan of the home renovation show knows that a major part of the process is taking the property down to the studs before rebuilding it.

The new HGTV show, No Demo Reno, is out to prove otherwise. Hosted by Jennifer Todryk (whose is known for her trademark red hair half down and half up in a bun), renovates her client’s homes without the hassle and stress that comes with demolition.

I find the premise of fixing up one’s home without completely destroying it first is interesting. But the truth is that after a couple of episodes I was bored. As much as I enjoy this type of show, it is a little too formulaic for me.

Do I recommend it? Maybe.

No Demo Reno airs on Thursday Night at 8PM on HGTV.

Throwback Thursday: Holmes and Holmes (2016-Present)

Living with family can be hard enough sometimes. Working with them, depending on the situation, has the potential to be ten times harder

The HGTV show, Holmes and Holmes follows the Mike Holmes and his son, Mike Jr., as they rebuild their client’s homes. Sometimes joined by Mike’s daughter Sherry, the viewer follows the family as go through the sometimes arduous process of creating their customer’s ideas of housing perfection.

At the end of the day, this is just another reality home renovation program. What makes it stand out is the unique dynamic that only comes from family.

Do I recommend it? Maybe.

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