Tag Archives: Jamie Gray Hyder

Celebrating Women’s History Month and the Female Characters Who Inspire Us

March is Women’s History Month. This year, I would like to shine a spotlight on some of the female characters who both push against the glass ceiling and inspire us.

Behind Her Eyes (Netflix): It would have been easy to peg Adele (Eve Hewson) as the wronged wife and Louise (Simona Brown) as a modern version of Glenn Close’s character from Fatal Attraction. But both women are given the opportunity to be fully fledged characters that go well beyond the stereotypes.

Bridgerton (Netflix): For non-fans of the BPD (British Period Drama), Bridgerton would just another Jane Austen-ish historical romance/drama. But fans know that though women are second class citizens in this world, they have other abilities that are not obvious to the naked eye. My favorite characters are Eloise Bridgerton (Claudia Jessie) and Lady Danbury (Adjoah Andoh). Instead of mindlessly following in her elder sister’s footsteps, Eloise would love to be free of the constrictions that women are placed under in the 19th century. For her part, Lady Danbury is a badass who knows of her place in society and uses her experiences wisely.

WandaVision (DisneyPlus): Every female character in this series is fully formed. As we learn more about this world and the women who inhabit it, their humanity is revealed in a manner that is normal and natural. They are allowed to be who they are without being pegged as certain character types and forced into boxes that can be easily checked off.

P.S. That series finale last night was nothing short of mind blowing. I don’t know about anyone else, but I am ready for season 2.

Law & Order: SVU (NBC): For a television show to last twenty plus years, it has to have a certain something about it. In a nutshell, what makes it stand out is the difficult subject the show brings to the forefront and the capable female detectives whose job it is to solve the crimes. At the head of the unit is Olivia Benson (Mariska Hargitay). Though she has been working sex crimes for decades, the job has not hardened her. She can be tough when she has to be, but she can also be compassion and humane. Amanda Rollins (Kelli Giddish) has fought against her demons and survived. That alone is worth its weight in gold. The newest and youngest member of the squad is Katriona Tamin (Jamie Gray Hyder). Though she still has a lot to learn, she has the passion and the drive to bring the criminals to justice.

Readers, what other female characters inspire you? Feel free to leave a comment in the comment section below.

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Filed under Books, DisneyPlus, Feminism, History, Jane Austen, Netflix, Television

Law & Order: SVU Character Review: Katriona “Kat” Tamin

*This will be my last character review for Law & Order SVU. The next group of characters I will be reviewing is….you will have to come back next week.

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. Read at your own risk if you have not watched the show.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front of us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

In this series of weekly blog posts, I will examine character using the characters from Law & Order: Special Victims Unit to explore how writers can create fully dimensional, human characters that audiences and readers can relate to.

There is a certain advantage to being the youngest and the newest employee. Unlike an employee who is experienced both in the job and within the company, this new employee may have an energy and an enthusiasm that overtakes their lack of experience.

On Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, the new detective on the squad is Katriona “Kat” Tamin (Jamie Gray Hyder). A transfer from Vice, Kat is young, eager and takes her job seriously. Her first case is going undercover as a young actress who is nearly assaulted by Tobias Moore (Ian McShane).

As dedicated as she is to her job, she understands that a little delicacy is sometimes needed. When a transgender woman comes forward with a rape accusation, Kat gently pushes the victim to provide the information needed to close the case.

To sum it up: To be young and enthusiastic about work is a unique experience that only comes during a certain time in our lives. Though we may become dejected or cynical later in life, it is this time that teaches us about the workplace. As a character, Kat stands out because of her youth, her energy and her dedication to her job. It is a lesson about work that should not fade, regardless of how long we are in the working world.

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Filed under Character Review, Feminism, New York City, Television