Tag Archives: Laurie Laurence

Little Women Character Review: Laurie Laurence

*Warning: This post contains spoilers in regards to the narrative and characters from the book Little Women by Louisa May Alcott. Read at your own risk if you have not read the book or have seen any of the adaptations.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

In this series of weekly blog posts, I will examine character using the characters from Little Women to explore how writers can create fully dimensional, human characters that audiences and readers can relate to.

First love is an experience that stays with us always. While it is more than likely that the relationship does not grow beyond youth, that person will always have a place in our hearts. In Little Women, Theodore Laurence, known as either Teddy or Laurie, is the boy next door. He has been besties with Jo March for years and has secretly been in love with her for most of their friendship.

On paper, Laurie would be a good match for Jo. The world that Laurie and Jo live in is still ruled on a certain level by social rank and income. The Laurence family, being of a higher social rank and a higher income than the March family, would be a step up for Jo. But despite Laurie’s best efforts, Jo turns him down. She understands that their marriage would not be a happy one. Laurie initially sulks like a school boy after Jo turns him down, but ends up going to Europe. While is Europe, he reunited with Jo’s younger sister Amy, whom he does fall in love with and marry.

To sum it up: Sometimes, as we grow up, we have figure out who is best for us. We may wish, hope and pray that our first love, whomever he or she will be, will be our last love. But for many, learning that our first love will not be our last love is often a painful growing experience. As writers, when creating this experience for our characters, it is incumbent that we demonstrate why this couple is not meant to be. If we do not demonstrate why this couple is meant to be, the writer has not done his or her job and leaves too many questions unanswered.

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Little Women Character Review: Amy March

*Warning: This post contains spoilers in regards to the narrative and characters from the book Little Women by Louisa May Alcott. Read at your own risk if you have not read the book or have seen any of the adaptations.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

In this series of weekly blog posts, I will examine character using the characters from Little Women to explore how writers can create fully dimensional, human characters that audiences and readers can relate to.

When it comes to the youngest child in a large family, it is often the case that he or she may be spoiled and/or babied by their parents and elder siblings. In Little Women, Amy March is the youngest of the four March sisters. Introduced to the reader as a pre-teen, Amy is a proud child who is used to being spoiled and babied by her parents and her sisters. She also has quite the dramatic streak and like Jo, can be temperamental at times.

She starts to grow up with a couple of events that will change the course of her life: nearly freezing to death in a lake and losing her elder sister, Beth. Eventually, she married Laurie Laurence, her long time neighbor who is also Jo’s bestie. An artist by heart and by nature, one of Amy’s great loves is her art.

While Amy never truly gives up the need to be popular or an eye on the finer things in life, she grows up to become a woman with a heart and a sense of gratitude.

To sum it up: Growing up is not and has never been a straight line. It is a zig zag,  a winding road that has pitfalls and challenges. There maybe some metaphorical potholes that cause a metaphorical skinned knee along the way. Like all of us, Amy does grow up, but not before having a few metaphorical skinned knees of her own along the way.  As writers, when creating characters who grow from childhood to adulthood over the course of the narrative, it is our job to ensure that audience/reader relates to the character’s growth from childhood to adulthood.

Amy March endures because her narrative is comparable to any coming of age story. The writer who is writing their own coming of age story ought to remember Amy’s story, because it is how a coming of age story should be written.

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Little Women Miniseries Review

For many young bookworms (especially if they are female), Little Women is one of the literary gateway drugs to other classic novels.

Last night, the first episode of the new miniseries aired on PBS.

Stepping into the shoes of the immortal March sisters is Willa Fitzgerald (Meg), Maya Hawke (Jo), Annes Elwy (Beth) and Kathryn Newton (Amy). Emily Watson plays Marmee and Jonah Hauer-King plays Laurie, Jo’s bestie/the boy next door.

I have mixed feelings about the first episode. Written by Heidi Thomas (best known as creator and show runner of Call The Midwife) was tasked with quite a challenge: condense the narrative as it is in the novel into a miniseries. While she hit all of the right narrative notes (including not making the story too sweet and allowing all four of the March sisters to share the spotlight), I just felt like something was missing. While I completely understand this is a miniseries and not a feature-length film (but then again, not all film adaptations of beloved books adhere 100% to the narrative in the source material), I just feel like something is missing.

Do I recommend it? Possibly yes.

Episodes two and three consecutively on May 20th at 8pm EST on PBS. 

 

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Filed under Books, Feminism, History, Television, TV Review