Tag Archives: Lisa O'Hare

New Amsterdam Character Review: Georgia Goodwin

*For the foreseeable future, some Character Review posts may not be published every Thursday as they have in the past.

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series New AmsterdamRead at your own risk if you have not watched the show.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front of us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

If we lived in an ideal world, we would all live to see old age, surrounded by those who love us. But we don’t live in an ideal world. Life is short, regardless of whether we live into our golden years or die before our time. On New Amsterdam, Georgia Goodwin (Lisa O’Hare) appears to be on track to live a long and healthy life. She is a dancer who is taking time off from work to prepare for the birth of her first child. Georgia and her husband, Max, (Ryan Eggold) are eager to meet their daughter.

But that eagerness is diminished. Between Max’s new job as New Amsterdam’s new Medical Director and his cancer diagnosis, Georgia is concerned about her husband. When they finally hash it out, Georgia stands by her man, even if her concerns are not quite alleviated.

Things get hairy towards of the end of her pregnancy. Her placenta ruptures. She begins to bleed out and loses consciousness. Lauren Bloom (Janet Montgomery) is in the area. Called to help by Max who is unable to choose between saving Georgia’s life or saving their baby, Lauren makes the choice for him. She does an emergency C-section, bringing Max and Georgia’s daughter safely in the world.

Sadly, Georgia does not live to meet her child. The ambulance they are riding in crashes on the way to the hospital. She dies in the hospital, leaving her husband emotionally broken and forced to raise their daughter alone.

To sum it up: We know that we should make the most of our time on this planet while we can. But sometimes, we caught up in the business of our days and forget that life is precious. Georgia’s unexpected death, for both the characters and the audience was heartbreaking. If nothing else, it is a reminder that instead of taking life for granted, we should be taking advantage of the opportunities while we can.

That is why she is a memorable character.

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Filed under Character Review, Feminism, New York City, Television

New Amsterdam Character Review: Lauren Bloom

*For the foreseeable future, some Character Review posts may not be published every Thursday as they have in the past.

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series New AmsterdamRead at your own risk if you have not watched the show.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front of us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

Addiction and mental health issues weigh heavily on the lives of millions around the world. It is easy to pretend that these issues don’t exist. But the reality is that until one is able to see that they need help, they will never begin to move on.

On New Amsterdam, Lauren Bloom (Janet Montgomery) is the head of the Emergency Department. Smart and efficient, she has the ability to manage a very busy staff while ensuring that the patients are looked after. But underneath her professional abilities, Lauren is facing the two-headed demon of addiction to Adderall and the unhealed emotional wounds from a traumatic childhood.

She is forced into rehab when her colleague and friend, Helen Sharpe (Freema Agyeman) notices that something is off with Lauren. Rehab forces her to confront her troubled past and deal with the addiction that has hindered her ability to emotionally recover. But life is not all sunshine and roses when Lauren returns to work.

After bringing Georgia Goodwin’s (Lisa O’Hare) daughter in the world, Lauren has a different recovery ahead of her when she survives a car wreck. Well aware of how easily she can slide back into addiction, she turns to Helen and Zach Ligon (JJ Feild), her physical therapist, and sometimes hookup partner for support.

In the end, Lauren is able to put her past behind her, but not without some serious soul searching and hard work.

To sum it up: There are two ways to deal with problems. The first is to pretend that nothing is wrong. The second is to admit that you need help. Though it is infinitely harder to admit that you need help, the payoff is worth the risk. In admitting that she has a problem, Lauren shows that she has the strength and courage to move beyond the demons that have plagued her for far too long.

That is why she is a memorable character.

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Filed under Character Review, Feminism, Mental Health, New York City, Television

New Amsterdam Character Review: Max Goodwin

The next group of characters I will be reviewing is…the characters from New Amsterdam.

*For the foreseeable future, some Character Review posts may not be published every Thursday as they have in the past.

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series New AmsterdamRead at your own risk if you have not watched the show.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front of us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

Life is all about balance. Most, if not all of us have a lot on our plates. It is merely a choice of what to prioritize and what to put on the back burner. On New Amsterdam, Max Goodwin (Ryan Eggold) has more than enough on his plate.

As the medical director of the fictional New Amsterdam hospital in New York City, Max has to deal with the needs of the patients vs. the sometimes bloated and arcane bureaucratic hospital system. He is also married to Georgia (Lisa O’Hare), who is carrying their first child. On top of all this, cancer is ravaging his body.

Max’s trademark question within the hospital is “How can I help?”. This question often leads to unorthodox methods of doing business, which riles the feathers of those who hired him. As work ramps up, his relationship with his wife and his need to treat his cancer suffers.

After Lisa dies in birth, Max adds two more things to his plate: raising his daughter alone and dealing with his wife’s unexpected passing. After his grief passes, he briefly gets involved with Alice Healy (Alison Luff). Like Max, Alice lost her husband very early into her daughter’s life. Though the relationship does not last, it provides the emotional jumping point for Max to move on with his life.

To sum it up: Finding a balance for everything in our lives is difficult. In an effort to maintain that balance, one or two things may end up being inadvertently dropped. But, in the end, we find that balance. Max finds that balance, but not without some heartache and tough decisions.

Which is why he is a memorable character.

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Filed under Character Review, New York City, Television