Jane Against the World: Roe v. Wade and the Fight for Reproductive Rights Book Review

Abortion in its various forms has existed for thousands of years. It is only in the last century or so that the idea of reproductive freedom and bodily autonomy has been written into law.

Jane Against the World: Roe v. Wade and the Fight for Reproductive Rights, by Karen Blumenthal, was published earlier this year. The book traces the history of abortion rights in America from Margaret Sanger and Anthony Comstock all the way to the present day. Written in a down-to-earth and colorful manner, Blumenthal lays out the facts in a way that anyone can understand the history of this topic and why is so important today.

This nonfiction, history book is an absolute must-read. Though the audience is YA, the material can be read by anyone who wants to get a full picture of the subject.

My only complaint is that the narrative lags in the center for a bit. Other than that, it was an excellent read and the perfect explanation of why we need Roe V. Wade codified into federal law.

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P.S. Did you see the news that by a large majority, Kansas voters voted to keep abortion legal? The message is clear: my body, my choice.

P.P.S Mothers Against Greg Abbott released an ad perfectly explaining why the government has no right to tell a woman what to do with her body.

Starts at:33

Terrible Virtue: A Novel Book Review

When we put those we admire on a pedestal, we sometimes forget that the person on the pedestal is a human being with the same faults as any other human being.

Margaret Sanger did not intentionally start out life as a first wave feminist and the originator of Planned Parenthood. Her life and the causes that dominated her life is chronicled in the novel Terrible Virtue: A Novel. Written by Ellen Feldman, the novel starts during Margaret’s early years. She is one of 13 children. Her mother dies young, after years of living through the endless cycle of having a children, working tirelessly to care for her family before having another child.

As an adult, Margaret marries and has three children of her own. She is drawn to the cause of abortion and women’s reproductive health. In spite of the laws at the time, Margaret (who is living in New York City) reaches out to the lower class and immigrant women who desperately need her services. While she is doing this, there are many who are fighting to see her jailed and her ability to help the women in need stopped indefinitely. Adding to the drama, Margaret is feeling the heat at home. Her marriage is falling apart and her children are starting to feel like they are second best.

 

I really enjoyed reading this book. I really enjoyed it because not only did the writer perfectly show Margaret Sanger as human being (not just a heroine on a pedestal), but also because the same issues that existed in her time sadly still exist in ours.

I absolutely recommend it.

 

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