Jon Stewart Spoke the Truth About the Republican’s Reactions to the PACT Act

When it comes to our veterans, the generally accepted response is to shake their hands and verbally thank them for putting their lives on the line. While that is well and good, we need to ensure that they have access to medical care that is unique to their experience.

Last week, many Republicans voted against the PACT act. The purpose of this legislation is to ensure that those who were exposed to burn pits can see a doctor when dealing with the adverse side effects of this exposure. Ironically, they voted for the bill last month.

The response from veterans and comedian/former The Daily Show host Jon Stewart was swift and loud.

Why does it take a famous comedian to shine the spotlight on what should be an obvious agreement? This is not a political issue that depends on one’s belief system. This bill and the money that is being put aside is for our fellow Americans who put their lives, their families, and their futures on hold to protect this nation and its values.

And how do we thank them for their service? Not by providing free treatment when they are living with cancer or another fatal disease? We tell them good night, good luck, and shove them out the figurative door. Let them die, let their families grieve, and deal with the multiple after-effects of that loss.

Like many men of their generation, both my grandfathers fought in World War II. When they came home, they were not kicked to the curb by the politicians of the era. They had the GI Bill. That gave them access to education, home ownership, etc. Where is the conscious of some of those in power today? I’d like to think that deep down, they have one. But I have yet to see it.

This was just another round of political “top that”. It’s not about serving the people, it is about their want to stay in power. Just another reason to vote them all out in November.

Invisible Storm: A Soldier’s Memoir of Politics and PTSD Book Review

Jason Kander is many things: a politician, a veteran, a published author, and a family man. He was also living with PTSD after serving his country.

Kander’s new memoir, Invisible Storm: A Soldier’s Memoir of Politics and PTSD, was published earlier this month. Back in 2017, Kander’s political future was bright. He was running for mayor in his hometown of Kansas City. All signs pointed to an easy victory. There were even whispers of him as a possible candidate in the 2020 Presidential election.

Then everything stopped. After being home from Afghanistan for more than a decade, he suddenly became depressed and suicidal. This deeply felt and dark memoir is the story of how the darkness nearly claimed him and the difficult task of recovery that he underwent to heal.

His story is personal, heartfelt, and a reminder that mental health is health. Just because the scars are not visible to the naked eye does not mean that the person is not suffering. What I was impressed by was how brutally honest Kander was about the experience. He also was very vocal about the fact that our veterans are not being given the medical care that is owed to them. They gave up almost everything for this country, the least we can do is ensure that they are as physically and mentally healthy as possible.

My favorite part of the book was the interjections by Kander’s wife, Diana. It shows that this disease does not only affect the person, it affects everyone they love. Mental illness requires a team effort to live with and/or overcome.

Do I recommend it? Absolutely.

Invisible Storm: A Soldier’s Memoir of Politics and PTSD is available wherever books are sold.

Flip or Flop: Fort Worth (2017-2018)

Getting into real estate as a profession is a gamble. The potential of earning more than a reasonable income is more than compelling. But, the risk is that if things go south, those involved could lose their shirt.

Flip or Flop: Fort Worth aired on HGTV from 2017-2018. A Texas offshoot of the original California-based series, the show follows married couple and military veterans Andy and Ashley Williams as they buy, renovate, and sell run-down houses. As with every show within this genre, there are always problems and the possibility of not being able to sell the finished product is always there in the background.

Unfortunately, some shows are not meant to last. As much as I enjoyed it, my opinion was not enough to keep it on the air for more than a year.

Do I recommend it? Yes.

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