The Matrix Resurrections Review

When The Matrix premiered in 1999, it was more than the standard science fiction good vs. evil movie with computer-generated effects and stunts. The narrative question was existential in nature. Both the special effects and the fight scenes were (and still are) awe-inspiring.

The 4th movie in the series, The Matrix Revolutions, premiered last week. Neo (Keanu Reeves) is torn between the world he sees and the world that is just beyond his consciousness. He is the creator of the best-selling video game of all time called The Matrix. He is also seeing a therapist, known as The Analyst (Neil Patrick Harris).

He begins to question his reality when Morpheus (Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, replacing Laurence Fishburne) comes back into his life. When he finally breaks from the world he has known, Neo can only save the day once more with the help of Trinity (Carrie-Anne Moss). But like Neo, she first has to see the truth.

I wanted to like this film, I really did. It tries to build on the legacy of its predecessors while adding new layers to the story. After nearly two decades. both Moss and Reeves still have the same chemistry. The addition of new cast members builds on this idea of fighting for our individuality instead of just going along with the rest of the crowd. Among the newbies, Harris stands out. I haven’t followed his career closely, but this character from what I know is not one that he normally plays.

The problem is that it just stretches on. It only perks up when Trinity wakes up, which is at about the 60% mark.

Do I recommend it? I would lean toward yes, but only if you have seen the three previous movies.

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Throwback Thursday-Doogie Howser, M.D. (1989-1993)

Being a teenager is hard enough. But adding something else to that plate makes life twice as hard and twice as interesting.

Doogie Howser, M.D. was on the air from 1989-1993. Doogie Howser (Neil Patrick Harris) is much more than the average teenage boy. He has the academic intellect of someone far older than he. This leads him to an early career in medicine. While delving in the adult world of medicine, he is also dealing with the emotional pitfalls of being a teenager.

This show, as I remember it, was interesting. The basic premise of the program is a fish out of water story meets a coming of age tale. Though the program is very much a part of its time, there is also a universal quality to the narrative.

Do I recommend it? I am leaning toward yes.

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