Tag Archives: New Amsterdam

New Amsterdam Character Review: Evie Garrison

*For the foreseeable future, some Character Review posts may not be published every Thursday as they have in the past.

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series New AmsterdamRead at your own risk if you have not watched the show.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front of us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

It was not so long ago that women had to choose between career and marriage. There was no such thing as being able to have both. Though times have thankfully changed, the pressure to hold down a job and maintain a marriage/romantic relationship can be overwhelming.

On New Amsterdam, Evie Garrison (Margot Bingham) is introduced to Floyd Reynolds (Jocko Sims) by Lauren Bloom (Janet Montgomery). It looks like this relationship is headed for the long haul, but there is one hitch. Evie takes a job in California, while Floyd stays in New York. They try to make their long distance relationship work, but it becomes clear that a choice must be made. In the end, Floyd joins Evie in California, finding the work/life balance that many of us wish we could have.

*Note: There would normally be a video here, but I can’t find one.

To sum it up: The things we want in life take work. Evie and Floyd are willing to do the work to make their relationship and marriage last. But that means making a sacrifice. That sacrifice is moving away from New York. The audience remembers Evie because she is ready, willing, and able to keep her marriage to Floyd afloat while having a satisfying career.

That is why she is a memorable character.

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New Amsterdam Character Review: Georgia Goodwin

*For the foreseeable future, some Character Review posts may not be published every Thursday as they have in the past.

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series New AmsterdamRead at your own risk if you have not watched the show.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front of us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

If we lived in an ideal world, we would all live to see old age, surrounded by those who love us. But we don’t live in an ideal world. Life is short, regardless of whether we live into our golden years or die before our time. On New Amsterdam, Georgia Goodwin (Lisa O’Hare) appears to be on track to live a long and healthy life. She is a dancer who is taking time off from work to prepare for the birth of her first child. Georgia and her husband, Max, (Ryan Eggold) are eager to meet their daughter.

But that eagerness is diminished. Between Max’s new job as New Amsterdam’s new Medical Director and his cancer diagnosis, Georgia is concerned about her husband. When they finally hash it out, Georgia stands by her man, even if her concerns are not quite alleviated.

Things get hairy towards of the end of her pregnancy. Her placenta ruptures. She begins to bleed out and loses consciousness. Lauren Bloom (Janet Montgomery) is in the area. Called to help by Max who is unable to choose between saving Georgia’s life or saving their baby, Lauren makes the choice for him. She does an emergency C-section, bringing Max and Georgia’s daughter safely in the world.

Sadly, Georgia does not live to meet her child. The ambulance they are riding in crashes on the way to the hospital. She dies in the hospital, leaving her husband emotionally broken and forced to raise their daughter alone.

To sum it up: We know that we should make the most of our time on this planet while we can. But sometimes, we caught up in the business of our days and forget that life is precious. Georgia’s unexpected death, for both the characters and the audience was heartbreaking. If nothing else, it is a reminder that instead of taking life for granted, we should be taking advantage of the opportunities while we can.

That is why she is a memorable character.

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New Amsterdam Character Review: Helen Sharpe

*For the foreseeable future, some Character Review posts may not be published every Thursday as they have in the past.

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series New AmsterdamRead at your own risk if you have not watched the show.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front of us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

When one chooses to join the medical profession, one needs more than just years of training and education. They need a heart, knowing that their working lives will be far from easy.

On New Amsterdam, Helen Sharpe is the head of Oncology and the former Deputy Medical Director at the fictional New Amsterdam hospital in New York City. Her introduction to her boss, Max Goodwin (Ryan Eggold) is not in the ER. Helen spends most of her time doing PR for the hospital and raising much-needed investment dollars.

When Helen finally returns to working with patients, her first patient is her boss. Max has cancer and isn’t exactly following doctor’s orders in terms of treatment. As both boss and patient, Helen’s relationship with Max becomes complicated and remains complicated.

The complication gets worse when Helen is arrested for taking a patient who is addicted to drugs to a safe injection site. On the brink of losing her job, Helen remains employed, but is demoted. Eventually she regains her place in the hospital hierarchy, but not without a few bumps along the way.

If her job wasn’t hard enough, Helen is becoming increasingly aware that her childbearing days will soon be behind her. Her adventures in romance and dating are both dead ends. There seems to be a growing romantic connection with Max, but being that he is married at the time, that idea is squashed. Then there is Akash Panthaki (Sendhil Ramamurthy). It looks like they are on the road to happily ever after, but Helen has doubts when he tells her that he already has two children. Eventually, they go their separate ways, she freezes her eggs and goes on with her life.

To sum it up: In a perfect world, one goes into medicine to help others. But, as we all know, we do not live in a perfect world. Helen’s job is not easy, especially when it comes to the not so black and white relationship she has with Max. But in the end, she is dedicated to her patients and puts them above her needs.

That is why she is a memorable character.

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New Amsterdam Character Review: Lauren Bloom

*For the foreseeable future, some Character Review posts may not be published every Thursday as they have in the past.

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series New AmsterdamRead at your own risk if you have not watched the show.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front of us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

Addiction and mental health issues weigh heavily on the lives of millions around the world. It is easy to pretend that these issues don’t exist. But the reality is that until one is able to see that they need help, they will never begin to move on.

On New Amsterdam, Lauren Bloom (Janet Montgomery) is the head of the Emergency Department. Smart and efficient, she has the ability to manage a very busy staff while ensuring that the patients are looked after. But underneath her professional abilities, Lauren is facing the two-headed demon of addiction to Adderall and the unhealed emotional wounds from a traumatic childhood.

She is forced into rehab when her colleague and friend, Helen Sharpe (Freema Agyeman) notices that something is off with Lauren. Rehab forces her to confront her troubled past and deal with the addiction that has hindered her ability to emotionally recover. But life is not all sunshine and roses when Lauren returns to work.

After bringing Georgia Goodwin’s (Lisa O’Hare) daughter in the world, Lauren has a different recovery ahead of her when she survives a car wreck. Well aware of how easily she can slide back into addiction, she turns to Helen and Zach Ligon (JJ Feild), her physical therapist, and sometimes hookup partner for support.

In the end, Lauren is able to put her past behind her, but not without some serious soul searching and hard work.

To sum it up: There are two ways to deal with problems. The first is to pretend that nothing is wrong. The second is to admit that you need help. Though it is infinitely harder to admit that you need help, the payoff is worth the risk. In admitting that she has a problem, Lauren shows that she has the strength and courage to move beyond the demons that have plagued her for far too long.

That is why she is a memorable character.

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New Amsterdam Character Review: Vijay Kapoor

*For the foreseeable future, some Character Review posts may not be published every Thursday as they have in the past.

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series New AmsterdamRead at your own risk if you have not watched the show.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front of us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

Life gets busy. We have work, we have school, we have families, etc. But what happens when one dominates the other and we begin to lose touch with what is important? On New Amsterdam, Vijay Kapoor (Anupam Kher), is the head of Neurology. Though he is a respected member of his field, his personal life is as much of a mess as his professional life is clean.

A widower with a grown son, Vijay has not had a relationship with Rohan (Vandit Bhatt) since his late wife’s passing. After plunging himself into work, Vijay tries to rebuild his relationship with his son. But even with all of the effort he puts in, the tentative new bond with his son fades. But there is one thing that will always keep the door open.

His son has a brief relationship with Ella (Dierdre Friel), who works in the hospital cafeteria. Ella is pregnant, but Rohan is nowhere to be found. Though his attempted romantic relationship with Ella died on the vine, Vijay recognizes the opportunity he has with his future grandchild. When her finances begin to run dry, Ella takes him up on his offer to move in together. They have some initial issues (as new roommates sometimes do), but in the end, Ella and Vijay come together, knowing that a new life will soon come into the world.

To sum it up: Ideally, we would all be able to maintain a work/life balance. But that is not always possible. Especially when emotions and complicated family dynamics come unto play. A man like Vijay would find it easy to bury himself in work and use it to mask his personal problems. But the fact that he is willing to face his past and learn from it shows that he is capable of moving forward.

That makes him a memorable character.

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New Amsterdam Character Review: Ignatius ‘Iggy’ Frome

*For the foreseeable future, some Character Review posts may not be published every Thursday as they have in the past.

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series New AmsterdamRead at your own risk if you have not watched the show.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front of us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

I’ve often talked about mental health and my own battle with depression on this blog. But what happens when the person with mental issues is also the doctor helping others with the same illnesses? On New Amsterdam, Dr. Ignatius ‘Iggy’ Frome is the head of psychology. In short, his job is to help his patients heal emotionally from whatever is holding them back. But while he is helping his patients, Iggy has his own issues to deal with.

Married to Martin McIntyre (Mike Doyle) and raising their three adopted children, Iggy’s life seems to be perfect. He has a loving husband, healthy children and a satisfying career. But as anyone dealing with mental illness can tell you, you can have it all and still feel like you have nothing.

Living with Disordered Eating, Iggy will bounce from eating junk all day to eating nothing at all. Affecting both his physical and mental health, the disorder begins to take a toll on him. He is also living with a negative self image that is only able to reveal itself in an intense therapy session with his husband. But this therapy session comes only after his marriage is on the brink of collapsing.

When he gets a call that another child is up for adoption, Iggy agrees to take the child without consulting Martin. When Martin finds out, he is naturally furious. They are only able to hash it out when the hospital is on lock down and there is no choice but to put it all out on the table. In the end, Iggy and Martin’s marriage returns to the stable place that it was in, but not Iggy shows a part of himself that few are able to show.

To sum it up: When you have a problem, the first step is admitting that you have a problem. But that first step is the hardest step to take. When Iggy takes that first step and admits that he has a problem, he can finally begin to heal and accept himself.

Which is why he is a memorable character.

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New Amsterdam Character Review: Floyd Reynolds

*For the foreseeable future, some Character Review posts may not be published every Thursday as they have in the past.

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series New AmsterdamRead at your own risk if you have not watched the show.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front of us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

Life, if nothing else, is a series of choices. While we may not be fully aware of the outcomes of our choices until they come to pass, the choices will forever play a part in the paths we take. On New Amsterdam, Floyd Reynolds (Jocko Sims) is the head of Cardiovascular Surgery at the fictional New Amsterdam hospital in New York City.

Like all of us, Floyd has made many choices. Some have ended well, some have not. When we meet him, he has been newly promoted to his new position. He is also still in the will they or won’t they stage with his ex-girlfriend and colleague, Lauren Bloom (Janet Montgomery). While still unsure about his relationship with Lauren, he starts to develop feelings for another colleague, Evie Garrison (Margot Bingham). Ironically, it was Lauren who set them up in the first place.

If this was not enough, Floyd is unsure if he should stay at this hospital while his boss, Max Goodwin (Ryan Eggold) has a meltdown. Though he chooses to stay at the hospital, the decision is not an easy one. Eventually, he does leave New Amsterdam. Evie, who he is now engaged to, has gotten a job at a hospital in California. In spite of the fact that his mother dislikes her and knowing that he is leaving his professional family behind, Floyd follows Evie to California.

To sum it up: Floyd is an interesting character because of the choices he makes. He chooses to be in a relationship with Lauren and then with Evie, knowing full well that he may not receive the approval he is searching for . He chooses to go to a new job and a new life in California, not knowing what lies ahead for him.

That is why he is a memorable character.

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New Amsterdam Character Review: Max Goodwin

The next group of characters I will be reviewing is…the characters from New Amsterdam.

*For the foreseeable future, some Character Review posts may not be published every Thursday as they have in the past.

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series New AmsterdamRead at your own risk if you have not watched the show.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front of us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

Life is all about balance. Most, if not all of us have a lot on our plates. It is merely a choice of what to prioritize and what to put on the back burner. On New Amsterdam, Max Goodwin (Ryan Eggold) has more than enough on his plate.

As the medical director of the fictional New Amsterdam hospital in New York City, Max has to deal with the needs of the patients vs. the sometimes bloated and arcane bureaucratic hospital system. He is also married to Georgia (Lisa O’Hare), who is carrying their first child. On top of all this, cancer is ravaging his body.

Max’s trademark question within the hospital is “How can I help?”. This question often leads to unorthodox methods of doing business, which riles the feathers of those who hired him. As work ramps up, his relationship with his wife and his need to treat his cancer suffers.

After Lisa dies in birth, Max adds two more things to his plate: raising his daughter alone and dealing with his wife’s unexpected passing. After his grief passes, he briefly gets involved with Alice Healy (Alison Luff). Like Max, Alice lost her husband very early into her daughter’s life. Though the relationship does not last, it provides the emotional jumping point for Max to move on with his life.

To sum it up: Finding a balance for everything in our lives is difficult. In an effort to maintain that balance, one or two things may end up being inadvertently dropped. But, in the end, we find that balance. Max finds that balance, but not without some heartache and tough decisions.

Which is why he is a memorable character.

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New Amsterdam Review

Anyone who has ever been in a management position can attest that a good part of their daily workload includes putting out figurative fires.

In the new NBC show, New Amsterdam, Dr. Max Goodwin (Ryan Eggold) is the new medical director of the fictional New Amsterdam hospital in New York City. New Amsterdam hospital is one of the oldest public hospitals in the country. He believes that treatment of patients comes before billing, which might not sit well with upper management. While he is juggling his new job, Max is dealing with his own health issues and the upcoming birth of his first child.

I really enjoyed the first episode. The writing, acting and pacing of the episode was just right. The show, for me, at least also highlighted that the medical industry has partially lost its way.  Patients come second, billing comes first.

I recommend it.

New Amsterdam airs 10pm on Tuesday night on NBC.

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