Tag Archives: Patrick Bronte

The Mother of the Brontes: When Maria Met Patrick Book Review

It is said that opposites attract. It can also be said that one can learn a lot about a person by knowing who and where they come from.

At first glance, the marriage between Maria Branwell, a gentlewoman from Penzance and Patrick Bronte, a fiery and poor clergyman from Ireland seemed like a mismatch. But if one were to look closer, one would see a marriage seemed almost ideal.

Sharon Wright’s new book, The Mother of the Brontes: When Maria Met Patrick, is the story of the marriage of Maria Branwell and Patrick Bronte. Maria was born in Penzance in 1783 to a prosperous family. Patrick was born in 1777 to a large and poor family in Ireland. Their courtship and marriage in 1812 to some might seem a bit impetuous. By the time she died in 1821, Maria brought six children into the world. Three daughters and a son, Branwell lived to adulthood. Her daughters, Charlotte, Anne, and Emily are revered today as some of the greatest writers of all time.

I loved this book. I loved it because it gave Maria the spotlight she rightly deserves. When we talk about the Brontes, their mother is often a footnote or a line or two. She is rarely given her due as a mother ought to receive. In bringing Maria’s story to life, the reader gains a greater perspective on her daughters and the literary worlds they created.

My only warning is that this book is not for the casual Bronte fan or the average reader looking for another book to read. It is for a reader who is well versed in the Brontes and their books.

I absolutely recommend it.

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Filed under Anne Bronte, Book Review, Books, Charlotte Bronte, Emily Bronte, History, Writing

The Bronte Myth Book Review

Among the great writers of the 19th century, the Bronte sisters stand tall. Lionized as proto-feminists and adored in the literary community for their contribution to the world of literature, fans sometimes have to ask themselves where fact ends and fiction begins.

In 2001, Lucasta Miller published The Bronte Myth. The book starts with the brief lives of the Charlotte, Emily and Anne Bronte and follows their posthumous celebrity as their image is shaped to fit the needs of the biographer. In the book, Ms. Miller delves deeply into the facts and the myths of the Brontes and how both have been used to tell the story of the legendary sisters.

When I heard about The Bronte Myth, the concept sounded interesting. I am sorry to report that the concept I had in my head did not meet reality.

The book is not for the casual or virgin Bronte fan. It borders on academic and is probably better suited for a reader who is well versed in the story of the Bronte sisters, their brother Branwell and father Patrick. But my main issue is that Ms. Miller spent most of the book talking about Charlotte. Granted, Charlotte lived the longest of her siblings, but the book is not entitled The Charlotte Bronte Myth. She spends about 60% of the book talking about Charlotte, 20% talking about Emily. The other 20% are given to Anne, Branwell and Patrick. I think I would have liked this book more if all of the Bronte siblings and their father were given equal attention.

Do I recommend it? Sort of.

 

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Filed under Anne Bronte, Book Review, Books, Charlotte Bronte, Emily Bronte, Feminism, History, Jane Eyre, Writing, Wuthering Heights

Happy Birthday Charlotte Bronte

For those who lived in her era, Charlotte Bronte was an unassuming person.

She was the oldest child of the widowed Patrick Bronte, a man of the cloth who some might have considered an odd duck. She lived in a dirty, poverty-stricken middle of nowhere town in Yorkshire, England. Her mother, Mariah and elder sisters, Mariah and Elizabeth died young, elevating Charlotte to the title of oldest Bronte child. Like her most famous heroine, Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte was without the standard bearers of her day that would have made her a catch in the marriage market: beauty, status and/or money.

Today is her birthday.

In our own time, we celebrate her genius and the genius of her sisters, Anne and Emily. Jane Eyre, like her other novels, is a respected classic that is beloved by readers the world over, is part of the syllabus in many a classroom and for better and/or worse has been adapted for the stage and the screen.

We remember her as a proto-feminist, a writer in an era when novel-writing belonged to men only and a woman who refused to quietly give in to the image of what a woman should be.

Happy Birthday, Charlotte Bronte.

 

 

 

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Filed under Anne Bronte, Books, Charlotte Bronte, Emily Bronte, Feminism, Jane Eyre

Happy Birthday Anne Bronte

Sometimes, when we make the decision to walk the path that is not walked by everyone else, we make history, even if we don’t know it at the time.

Anne Bronte was born on this day in 1820. The youngest of Patrick and Maria Bronte’s six children, she died at the young age of 29. In her lifetime, she completed two novels, Agnes Grey and The Tenant Of Wildfell Hall.

While she is often not given the respect and name recognition that goes to her elder sisters, Charlotte and Emily, her writing is on par with her sisters. Writing about every day life in Victorian England, her writing stands out because she spoke of the truth of what it was to be a woman in the period. In Agnes Grey, she wrote about a woman whose respectable career choices were severely limited and must work as a governess to support herself and her family. Agnes’s charges are spoiled and their parents are apathetic to their children’s behavior. In Tenant Of Wildfell Hall, a woman arrives in a small rural town, presenting herself as a widow with a young son. The truth about her identity made a small, but important dent in the worldwide women’s movement that is still being felt today.

As a writer and a proto-feminist, Anne Bronte, along with her sisters, helped to pave the way for women and women writers that continues to be felt a century and a half after her untimely passing.

Wherever you are, Anne Bronte, happy birthday.

 

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The World Within: A Novel of Emily Brontë Book Review

Among the three Bronte sisters, Emily, the second to youngest was the most introspective and private. Her social circle was limited to her family, her close friends and her animals. She rarely traveled outside of her hometown of Haworth, England. She was not concerned with being fashionable or climbing the social ladder. Her sole completed novel, Wuthering Heights is one of the most respected and admired novels in the English language.

Jane Eagland’s 2015 novel, The World Within: A Novel of Emily Brontë, takes place when Emily is a teenager. Her widowed father, Patrick is doing his best to raise his children with the help of his sister-in-law. The Bronte children have created stories over the years about vast and imaginative lands with colorful characters. But life is beginning to change, as it must.

Patrick gets sick and there is a concern about what will happen if he does not survive. The sisters realize that they must learn to fend for themselves. But the question is, how will they learn to fend themselves with no dowry, no connections, no income and limited professional opportunities that does not include marriage?

Among the Bronte sisters, Emily is the most fascinating. She was passionate, opinionated and fiery. And yet under the mask of the quiet Parson’s daughter, few knew who she really was. As a reader, a writer and a fan of the Brontes, it’s always interesting to learn what events and experiences shaped them into the women we know them to be today. The question is then, can a modern writer truly find their way into Emily’s life and psyche to write a novel about Emily Bronte before she became the giant of literature that we know her to be today?

On a scale of 1-10, 10 meaning the book was superb and 1 being that the book is horrible, I would give the book a rating of 5. It was ok, but it was a bit slow in the beginning and I struggled to stay focused on the story during parts of the narrative.

Do I recommend it? Maybe.

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To Walk Invisible Review

The key elements of a successful biopic, especially one where the subjects are legendary in their own right, are as follows: a compelling narrative and adherence to the facts of the subject’s life to engage both the novice viewer and the viewer who is well versed on the subject’s life.

On Sunday night, PBS aired To Walk Invisible, a biopic of the Brontes. The Reverend Patrick Bronte (Jonathan Pryce) is a widower living with his surviving children, who are all grown and seem to be flailing emotionally. The eldest daughter, Charlotte (Finn Atkins) is passionate and ambitious. Branwell, the only boy (Adam Nagaitis) is the ne’er-do-well dreamer with the growing alcohol addiction. Emily (Chloe Pirrie) is as fiery as she is private. The baby of the family, Anne (Charlie Murphy) is the peace maker.

As the sisters work towards their dream of becoming published authors, Branwell descends rapidly into a haze of grief and addiction that will overtake the entire family.

Anyone who knows me (or has read this blog), knows that I worship the literary ground that the Brontes walk on. Their books are nothing short of genius. Unfortunately, I cannot say that same about this television movie. Granted, it is one shot, 2 hour television movie, so for timing reasons, cannot contain every moment of their lives. That’s not my issue.

My issue is that it went a little too fast and the ending felt very abrupt. Certain facts (which I will not mention here due to the fact that they are a little spoiler-y for novice Bronte fans) were not mentioned. Not only that, but the narrative spent too much time on Branwell and not enough time on his sisters, who are the main characters.

Do I recommend it? As much as I would love to say an enthusiastic yes, I can’t. I have to give a mere maybe.

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Filed under Anne Bronte, Books, Character Review, Emily Bronte, Feminism, History, Jane Eyre, Television, TV Review, Writing, Wuthering Heights

To Walk Invisible Trailer

A good biopic is hard to come by. On one hand, it has to be true to the real life subjects that are being portrayed on-screen. But, on the other hand, it must be entertaining and keep the audience engaged.

To Walk Invisible is the new biopic based on the life Emily, Anne and Charlotte Bronte. Stepping into the roles of the the legendary sisters are Charlie Murphy (Anne Bronte), Chloe Pirrie (Emily Bronte) and Finn Atkins (Charlotte Bronte). Playing their widower father Patrick is Jonathan Pryce and their brilliant but drug addicted brother, Branwell is Adam Nagaitis.

While there is no official air date in the US (it premieres in the UK on December 29th), I have a feeling the bookworms, anglophiles and Bronte fans will be pleased with this fictional imaging of the three of the world’s greatest authors.

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Solsbury Hill: A Novel Book Review

To those who knew her during her short lifetime, Emily Bronte was simply the shy, eccentric daughter of Patrick Bronte, a man who was fiercer in his eccentricities than his daughter. Keeping to close family and friends and to nature, the next to youngest Miss Bronte was not much for fashionable society.  Her sole novel, Wuthering Heights, is the story of unfulfilled, wild passion against a sea of Victorian sensibility and propriety. She died at the young age of 30, leaving her mark in the world via her novel, which is still beloved and debated 160 years after its initial publishing.

But what if there was more to Emily Bronte? What if the passion between her iconic lovers, Heathcliff and Cathy were an echo of her own life?

In Solsbury Hill: A Novel, by Susan Wyler starts in modern-day New York City. Eleanor Abbott appears to know her path in life. Her career as a fashion designer is starting to take off. Her relationship with Miles, her boyfriend/childhood best friend is nothing but solid.  Then, as all good novels start, the protagonist is knocked off that projected path. First Eleanor catches Miles cheating on her. Then she receives a phone call about her Aunt Alice, her late mother’s older sister. Alice is on her deathbed and wants to see her niece one last time before she leave this world.

Leaving the concrete jungle for the wild moors of Yorkshire,  Eleanor is swept into a mystery about her family past and how they might be connected to Emily Bronte. Encountering ghosts, a family mystery and her aunt’s adopted son, Eleanor is drawn into the past as she tries to figure out where  her heart and her future lies.

I will say it straight out. I loved this book. I loved the mystery, I loved how Ms. Wyler hooked me right away. I also loved that Ms. Wyler kept the undercurrent of the narrative of Wuthering Heights while exploring the idea that the image that modern readers have of Emily Bronte might differ from the reality of her life.

I absolutely recommend it.

 

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Emily’s Ghost Book Review

Among the literary set, Emily Bronte is a giant among giants. Her sole novel, Wuthering Heights, is equally one of the most romantic novels ever written while exposing to hypocrisy of life in Victorian England.

In 2010, Denise Giardina published Emily’s Ghost. Taking the reader into the head of one of the most reclusive writers, we see the world through Emily’s eyes. Disdaining proper society, Emily Bronte is an outsider who has no pretensions to fit in. She wears outdated fashion, rarely speaks to anyone outside of her family, is happiest walking on moors with her pets and writes poetry that is fiercely contradictory to the image that most see of her.

Enter William Weightman. Patrick Bronte is not a young man anymore. Mr. Weightman is hired to take on the duties that Reverend Bronte cannot. Young, open-hearted and idealistic, William Weightman is sought after by several young women as a prospective husband. Surprisingly, he slowly falls in love with Patrick Bronte’s second to youngest daughter, who is anything but conventional. Despite her misgivings about living a conventional life and all that it entails (marriage included), Emily is equally in love.  While I keep hoping that Emily Bronte will have a happy ending, history would dictate otherwise.

This book is nothing short of amazing. Seeing the world through the eyes of one of the greatest writers of the English language was thrilling. As a writer and a woman, I find Emily Bronte (and her sisters by extension), to be nothing short of heroes. They defied the idea of what it was not just to be a writer and a woman, but to be a woman writer. In breaking the mold, they paved the way for the rest of us.

I absolutely recommend this book.

 

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Notable Birthdays

Today, April 21st is the birthday of two important and very notable women who proved and continue to prove that women are far more capable than some think they are.

Charlotte Bronte was born 200 years ago today.

Her early years could have not, by any stretch of the imagination, predicted her success as a writer during her adult years.

The third child of Patrick and Maria Bronte, Charlotte tragically became the oldest child after her two older sisters, Maria and Elizabeth died of childhood disease.   After Mrs. Bronte died soon after the birth of her youngest child, Patrick Bronte raised his children with the help of his sister-in-law.

As an adult, Charlotte Bronte was her father’s daughter. An early feminist and a great reader, Bronte’s most famous novel Jane Eyre is the story of an orphaned young woman who overcomes all of the barriers that Victorian society placed before her to find happiness.

Today is also the 90th birthday of Queen Elizabeth II.

Sitting on the throne since the late 1940’s, she has surpassed her great-great- grandmother, Queen Victoria as the world’s longest reigning monarch.

Taking the throne in an era when women were told that their lives were best spent as wives and mothers, she proved that a woman is capable to maintaining a career while living the traditional life of a wife and mother.

Happy Birthday.

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