Tag Archives: Queen Elizabeth II Of England

The Other Windsor Girl: A Novel of Princess Margaret, Royal Rebel Book Review

It’s hard to be the younger sibling. Especially when your older sibling(s) are beloved.

The late Princess Margaret, younger sister of Queen Elizabeth II, was quite the wild child back in the day.

Her story is told in the new novel, The Other Windsor Girl: A Novel of Princess Margaret, Royal Rebel, by Georgie Blalock. Through the eyes of Vera Strathmore, the daughter of an impoverished aristocratic family, the viewer is swept into the world of Princess Margaret. At the beginning of the novel, Margaret is young, spoiled, passionate and tempestuous. Vera, still hurting from the death of fiance during World War II, is a writer who dreams of moving to New York.

A chance encounter with Margaret changes Vera’s life and her priorities. Drawn into Margaret’s inner circle, Vera watches as she falls madly in love with Peter Townsend. Peter works for the royal household, is older and married. Despite the criticism, Margaret is determined to have her man.

While Margaret is cordoned into royal responsibilities, Vera begins to wish to be untied from a life tied to the Princess. Soon another scandal envelopes Margaret and Vera must choose how she wants to spend the rest of her life.

This book is brilliant. There is a perception when it comes to royalty, that living that life is akin to a fairy tale. But the reality of that is life far from the fairy tale that it is perceived to be. In telling Princess Margaret’s story through the eyes of Vera, the viewer is taken to a world that is essentially a golden cage. It is a cage that when perceived from within, can be unappealing.

I recommend it.

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Filed under Book Review, Books, Fairy Tales, History, New York City, Writing

Charles III Review

Fairy tales often have what if quality to them.

The play, King Charles III, adds to the what if quality of the fairy tale. It is set in an alternative world where Queen Elizabeth II has died and Prince Charles has ascended to the throne. But his time as King is shaky and those closest to him begin to question if Charles can wear the crown.

Last night, PBS aired a television adaptation of the play. Several actors from the play returning to their stage roles; the late Tim Pigott-Smith (Charles), Margot Leicester (Camilla), Oliver Chris (William) and Richard Goulding (Harry). Stepping the roles for the first time were Charlotte Riley (Kate) and Jess (Tamara Lawrance).

While I did not see the play I found the television adaptation interesting. It was interesting because what’s behind closed doors is often more fascinating than the face that we put out for the world to see. Bringing the audience into a world that few of us will ever see added to the heightened drama and the suspense of what questioning if Charles could be successful as King Of England was the hook I needed.

I recommend it.

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Filed under Fairy Tales, Television, TV Review

A Royal Night Out Movie Review

No one goes through life without at least one youthful rebellion to call their own. Not even royalty.

In the 2015 film, A Royal Night Out, World War II has just ended. The British people have taken to the streets, elated that the war is over.

Inside Buckingham Palace, Princess Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon) and Princess Margaret (Bel Powley) are eager to join in the celebration. But their parents, the King and Queen of England (Rupert Everett and Emily Watson) would prefer that their daughters celebrate within the castle walls. With a little bit of coaxing from the girls, permission is granted by the King And Queen. But there are a few caveats: the girls must stay with the soldiers who have been assigned to chaperone them, attend only approved events and be home by a certain time.

The exact opposite occurs. Combining the elements of adventure, the potential of young romance and a little youthful rebellion, this film introduces audiences of a certain age to a new side of Queen Elizabeth II: young, eager for adventure and willing to take a few risks.

What I like about this film is that it speaks to all us. We have all, in own unique ways, rebelled against the constrictions placed upon by our elders. There is a danger and an excitement to that rebellion, regardless of the details of the rebellion.

I recommend it.

A Royal Night Out is on DVD.

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Filed under History, Life, Movie Review, Movies

Notable Birthdays

Today, April 21st is the birthday of two important and very notable women who proved and continue to prove that women are far more capable than some think they are.

Charlotte Bronte was born 200 years ago today.

Her early years could have not, by any stretch of the imagination, predicted her success as a writer during her adult years.

The third child of Patrick and Maria Bronte, Charlotte tragically became the oldest child after her two older sisters, Maria and Elizabeth died of childhood disease.   After Mrs. Bronte died soon after the birth of her youngest child, Patrick Bronte raised his children with the help of his sister-in-law.

As an adult, Charlotte Bronte was her father’s daughter. An early feminist and a great reader, Bronte’s most famous novel Jane Eyre is the story of an orphaned young woman who overcomes all of the barriers that Victorian society placed before her to find happiness.

Today is also the 90th birthday of Queen Elizabeth II.

Sitting on the throne since the late 1940’s, she has surpassed her great-great- grandmother, Queen Victoria as the world’s longest reigning monarch.

Taking the throne in an era when women were told that their lives were best spent as wives and mothers, she proved that a woman is capable to maintaining a career while living the traditional life of a wife and mother.

Happy Birthday.

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Filed under Books, Charlotte Bronte, Feminism, History, Jane Eyre, Writing

Young Elizabeth Book Review

For those of us under a certain age, Queen Elizabeth II of England is simply the Queen Of England. She has ruled England since 1952. We don’t know her as anything else or anyone else.

Kate William’s new book, Young Elizabeth, The Making Of A Queen,  takes the reader back to Elizabeth’s childhood and tells the story of how she became Queen.

Born in 1926 to the Duke and Duchess of York, Elizabeth was not expected to become Queen. Her father (who would only ascend to the throne after his elder brother abdicated to marry his American mistress) would later become King George VI, was the second son. Having no brothers or close male relations who could step in front of her, Elizabeth, the first-born of two daughters, became heir to the throne when her father became King.  The book starts with an overview of Elizabeth’s family tree and includes her great-great-grandmother, Queen Victoria.  It then takes the reader through Elizabeth’s life up to her 25th year, when she ascended to the throne.

As an Anglophile, a history nerd and a feminist, I found this book to be very interesting. History is full of Kings, but Queens, especially ones that have ruled for as long as Elizabeth has are far and few between. However, the writing tends to be dry in some areas. I get that this is a memoir and not a novel. However, that does not mean that the writing cannot have a life and a bounce to it. I enjoyed it, but someone who does not have the interests I have may not.

Do I recommend it? Maybe.

 

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Filed under Book Review, Books, Feminism, History, Life