Tag Archives: Rebecca Traister

Good and Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Women’s Anger Book Review

Gloria Steinem is said to have once stated the following:

“The truth will set you free, but first it will piss you off.”

Rebecca Traister‘s new book, Good and Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Women’s Anger, explains in no uncertain terms that American women are angry and not afraid to show that anger. For far too long, women’s anger has been dismissed, especially in politics. An angry women is a b*tch, unlikable and therefore not able to speak for and represent her potential or existing constituents. In the book, Ms. Traister writes about the history of how women’s political anger in the United States has transformed the country in such a way that we can never go back to where we came were.

I loved this book. Powerfully written, Ms. Traister not only illustrates how far we have come, but how far we have to go.

I heartily recommend it.

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Filed under Book Review, Books, Feminism, History, Politics

All the Single Ladies: Unmarried Women and the Rise of an Independent Nation Book Review

Once upon a time (and still in some parts of the world today) the worst thing a woman could be was single and childless.

Rebecca Traister’s new book, All the Single Ladies: Unmarried Women and the Rise of an Independent Nation, explores not only the history of single women in this country, but how the modern single woman deal with being single today.

Mingling interviews with single women of various races and economic levels with press clippings from the past, Ms. Traister examines how single women in the past dealt with the challenges of a life without a husband compared to today. She also speaks to the reasons that women today choose to delay or entirely put off marriage.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book. As a single woman, I appreciated both the historical aspect of the book and the reasons why women today are choosing to either temporarily or permanently put off the traditional role of a wife. I also appreciated the fact that she spoke of the fact that women of color have been single, working mothers for generations while white middle class women are relatively new to (compared to women of color) the idea of being single and working for a living.

I recommend it.

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Filed under Book Review, Books, Feminism, History