Tag Archives: Rob Reiner

Thoughts On the 30th Anniversary of When Harry Met Sally

There are romantic comedies and then there are romantic comedies. The first type of romantic comedy is semi-memorable, but when it comes down to it, the audience does not think of the film after they have the left the theater. The second second type of romantic comedy has legs long after the film has left the theater. It remains a favorite of audiences and critics and is celebrated as a hallmark of the genre.

When Harry Met Sally is one of these films. This month is the 30th anniversary of the film’s release.

Harry Burns (Billy Crystal) and Sally Albright (Meg Ryan) meet just after they both graduate from the University of Chicago. She offers him a ride from Chicago to New York. They become friends, but come together and drift apart as life changes. After a series of failed relationships on both their parts, Harry and Sally reconnect. The question that defines their relationship is as follows: can men and women be friends without sex getting in the way?

Directed Rob Reiner, this film is an out and out classics. It has all of the hallmarks of the romantic comedy genre without stretching the patience of the audience. Ryan and Crystal have amazing chemistry and just work as the friends who might or might be something more.

It has one of the iconic scenes and one of the most iconic lines in movie history set in one of the best restaurants in New York City, the 2nd Ave Deli.

Happy Anniversary When Harry Met Sally.

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Throwback Thursday TV Edition- All In The Family

All In The Family is an undisputed classic.

The pilot aired on January 12th, 1971. It was nothing short of earth shattering.

Archie Bunker (the late Carroll O’Connor) is a middle aged, working class World War II veteran. He lives in Queens with his loyal but slightly ditzy wife, Edith (the late Jean Stapleton), his daughter Gloria (Sally Struthers) and his liberal son in law (Rob Reiner).

Archie has opinions today that would not be considered politically correct. He does not hesitate to share those opinions, especially about those who disagree with him or those who he doesn’t like. Archie represents the generation that came of age during the depression and World War II, the generation that was middle aged with growing or grown children during the late 1960’s and early 1970’s. Despite his beliefs, Archie is still a decent guy who is trying to adapt to the changing world.

Family sitcoms before All In The Family were lovey-dovey, ooey gooey, with a teachable moment and a story line that was wrapped up neatly within 30 minutes. All In The Family changed that. The characters were flawed and human, using language that had not been heard before on American television. It exposed the raw nerve that was the American culture in that period. After 40+ years, this show is still relevant and still funny.

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