Tag Archives: romantic relationships

Crazy Rich Asians Movie Review

One of the most common tropes of the romantic comedy genre is the objection to one half of the lead couple by their well-meaning family and/or friends. The question is, is this common narrative used wisely or is it an easy way out by the writer or writers?

In the new movie Crazy Rich Asians (based upon the book of the same name by Kevin Kwan), Rachel Chu (Constance Wu) is a Chinese American college professor living and working in New York City. She has been dating Nick Young (Henry Golding) for a year when he invites her to join him at a family wedding in Singapore. Nick hasn’t exactly been forthcoming  with Rachel about who his family is in the social hierarchy of Singaporean society. When they get to Singapore, Nick’s mother, Eleanor (Michelle Yeoh) isn’t exactly pleased with her son’s choice of a partner.

But Rachel is not without allies. Her college roommate, Peik Lin Goh (Awkwafina) is from Singapore and has been begging Rachel to come visit for while. Rachel also becomes close friends with Nick’s cousin, Astrid Young Teo (Gemma Chan), whose life is not as perfect as it seems. Will Rachel and Nick live out their happily ever after or will his family get in the way?

While Crazy Rich Asians falls squarely within the romantic comedy genre (with the standard character tropes and narrative), it is not the same old, dry predictable romantic comedy. Aside from a cast of Asian and Asian-American actors (which is a long time coming), the movie is funny, charming, romantic and heaves much needed life into a genre that for many died a long time ago.

I absolutely recommend it.

Crazy Rich Asians is presently in theaters. 

 

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Filed under Books, Movie Review, Movies, New York City

Spinster Book Review

The official definition of a spinster is : an unmarried woman, typically an older woman beyond the usual age for marriage.

According the Census from last September, 105 million Americans 18 and older are not married. 53% are female, 47% are male.

In the 1950’s and early 1960’s half of all women were married. The average age of the women who were saying “I do” was 20.

In Kate Bolick’s new book, Spinster: Making A Life Of One’s Own, while writing about her previous romantic relationships, she writes about five noted women writers who chose to be single. The questions she asks about men, marriage, romantic relationships and work are timeless.

The women she writes about include Edna St. Vincent Millay, Neith Boyce, and Edith Wharton.

I enjoyed this book. Ms. Bolick does a nice job of entwining her own personal experience with the women whom she admires and writes about.

I recommend this book.

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Filed under Book Review, Books, Edith Wharton, Feminism, Writing