Tag Archives: Rufus Carlin

Timeless Character Review: Connor Mason

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series Timeless. Read at your own risk if you have not watched the first two seasons.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

In this series of weekly blog posts, I will examine character using the characters from Timeless to explore how writers can create fully dimensional, human characters that audiences and readers can relate to.

When one usually sees a business owner on film or on television, he or she is usually the villain. More concerned with making money and keeping their business alive than tending to the needs of their staff, they are willing to do anything to ensure that the bottom line is kept to their standards. In Timeless, that business owner is Connor Mason (Paterson Joseph). Connor is the founder of Mason Industries, the company that has built the time machine that the Time Team uses to travel through time.

A mentor to Rufus Carlin (Malcolm Barrett), Connor got involved with Rittenhouse when they helped him resolve his financial issues. This led to Connor forcing Rufus to secretly conversations with the rest of the Time Team to help Rittenhouse. His conscious finally got the best of his two timing when he took the blame for an explosion that was caused by Rittenhouse.

After the explosion, Connor is humbled and has to live without the money and the fame that came with his previous life.

To sum it up: There is an old saying: pride goeth before the fall. Connor Mason, the hotshot inventor and millionaire businessman thought he was all that. Then he realized that he was not all that. His dealings with Rittenhouse put the entire Time Team in danger and destroyed what he worked hard to achieve.  But, in the end, he realized that there is more to life than business and making money. As preachy as it sounds, the concept of appreciating the simpler things in life and appreciating those who love you will never disappear.

Leave a comment

Filed under Character Review, History, Television

Timeless Character Review: Jiya

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series Timeless. Read at your own risk if you have not watched the first two seasons.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

In this series of weekly blog posts, I will examine character using the characters from Timeless to explore how writers can create fully dimensional, human characters that audiences and readers can relate to.

Behind every team in the field is a support system who is not in the field, but is as important as those on site. On Timeless, Jiya (Claudia Doumit) started out as the person behind the controls while Lucy, Wyatt and Rufus travel through time. Then she takes Rufus’s (Malcolm Barrett) place after he is injured, though her piloting skills are not as strong as Rufus’s. 

After passing out from what is thought to be the effects of time travel, Jiya discovers that she has visions and can predict the future. This causes her to break away emotionally from Rufus and their relationship, in an effort to protect him. 

 

To sum it up: Every major character is important, regardless of their time on the page or the screen. Jiya is important, not only because she holds the fort down, but because her abilities and the information she provides helps her colleagues to do their jobs. As writers,one of our jobs is to ensure that all of our characters receive  appropriate time in the limelight. We cannot forget some of them because they are not always in the foreground.

Leave a comment

Filed under Character Review, History, Television

Timeless Character Review: Rufus Carlin

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series Timeless. Read at your own risk if you have not watched the first two seasons.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

In this series of weekly blog posts, I will examine character using the characters from Timeless to explore how writers can create fully dimensional, human characters that audiences and readers can relate to.

Every ship needs a captain and every crew needs a conscious. In Timeless, the captain of the Lifeboat is Rufus Carlin (Malcolm Barrett). Rufus is an engineer and programmer who is assigned to pilot the time machine. He is also the conscious of the main trio of characters, due mostly to his skin color and the heavy reminder of racism in America. Rufus also dealt with betrayal when his mentor reveals that he was not kidnapped, he willingly joined up with the villain and made it look like a kidnapping.

But there is light in Rufus’s life. His relationship with girlfriend Jiya (Claudia Doumit) is going strong. They were colleagues before they got together, Rufus had a crush on Jiya for a long time, but was unable to give voice to his feelings.

To sum it up: When a character is the conscious of the story, he or she does not need to be 2D, dull or preachy. Rufus works as a character because though he is the conscious of the show, he is thoroughly human. As an audience member, we root for him when he stands up against racism, we love him when it comes to his relationship with Jiya and and we feel his pain when his mentor is revealed as a traitor. That is why Rufus Carlin stands out as a character.

Leave a comment

Filed under Character Review, History, Television

Timeless Character Review: Wyatt Logan

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series Timeless. Read at your own risk if you have not watched the first two seasons.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

In this series of weekly blog posts, I will examine character using the characters from Timeless to explore how writers can create fully dimensional, human characters that audiences and readers can relate to.

When one meets a member of the military, there is a certain expectation of who this person is. Especially if this person is male. On the battlefield, they are on the front lines, ready to fight. But when they return to civilian life, things are not as simple.

Wyatt Logan (Matt Lanter) is the brawn of the time team. Before traveling through time to save American history, he was part of the Delta Force. When it comes to battle, Wyatt is in his element. He has no problem stepping in and using force to keep the Lucy (Abigail Spencer) and Rufus (Malcolm Barrett) safe. But underneath that warrior shell is a deep personal loss that motivates Wyatt to fight.

Prior to joining the time team, Wyatt’s wife was murdered. He blamed himself and got lost in a haze of grief. Though he continued to put his marriage and his late wife on a pedestal, Wyatt revealed that their marriage was on shaky ground.

As Wyatt spent more time with Lucy and Rufus, he began to heal. He also fell in love with Lucy and she with him. But then, his wife was brought back to life and Wyatt was forced to make a choice. If that was not enough, his wife revealed that she worked for the enemy and everything in Wyatt’s world turned upside down once again.

To sum it up: Creating a character is about balance. Wyatt works as a character because he is both a bad ass soldier and a man dealing with complicated emotions. Both intertwine to create a character who is complicated, human and speaks to the audience.

Leave a comment

Filed under Character Review, History, Television

Timeless Character Review: Lucy Preston

The new group of characters I will be reviewing is…the characters from Timeless.

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series Timeless. Read at your own risk if you have not watched the first two seasons.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

In this series of weekly blog posts, I will examine character using the characters from Timeless to explore how writers can create fully dimensional, human characters that audiences and readers can relate to.

There is a myth about smart girls. She has the brains, but not the looks or the social intelligence. In Timeless, Lucy Preston (Abigail Spencer) breaks that myth entirely. Lucy is a history professor who is hired by a private organization to join a team that will travel through time and stop a terrorist from changing history.  The other members of the team are Wyatt Logan (Matt Lanter), a former member of the military and Rufus Carlin (Malcolm Barrett), a scientist who is also in charge of piloting the time machine.

Though Lucy is the brains of the outfit, she is not the damsel in distress and not seen as less than compared to her male colleagues. Lucy is smart, tough and can roll with the punches. She also has an interesting relationship with Wyatt, which starts off as strictly business, but becomes more complicated as they get to know each other.

To sum it up: When it comes to how women are portrayed on the page and on the screen, they are often put into a box and kept in the box over the course of the narrative. Lucy Preston stepped out of the box in the first episode and never looked back. Though she is smart, she is not just relegated to the smart girl box. She is thoroughly capable of being part of the team and able to stand on her own two feet.

Writers, whether they know it or not, can change the world. The writing team behind Timeless understands this, especially when it comes to how women are portrayed and seen in popular media. In creating Lucy, they are not only changing the fictional world in Timeless, but helping to advance women in the real world to real and lasting equality.

Leave a comment

Filed under Character Review, Feminism, History, Television