Tag Archives: Suffragette

On This International Women’s Day, I Just Want to Say Thank You

Today is International Women’s Day.

There is a lot that has been said, but I feel like it comes down to two words: thank you.

Thank you to the generations of women who have come before us. Their bravery, strength, and courage paved the way for us.

Thank you to the current generation of women who continue to fight for our rights. And finally, thank you to the future generation of women who will end the fight and live within the equal world that we are all fighting for.

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Thoughts On The Beginning Of Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month.

Nowadays, the fact that women have accomplishments and responsibilities outside of the traditional female sphere seems normal. But the reality is that it was not too long ago that women had no rights and had to fight for even the most basic of rights that men take for granted. The 19th Amendment was only ratified in 1920.

Don’t get me wrong, our accomplishments in only a few generations are nothing short of breathtaking. When our fore mothers were simply fighting for the right to vote and have a voice in their government, they might not have foreseen the snowball effect of wanting to vote. The educational and professional opportunities that were once closed to us are now ours for the taking. We can choose if and when we marry and have children.  Our lives are our own.

But even with all of that, there are still many battles to fight:

  • Equal pay for equal work.
  • Safety from sexual violence, at home, on the street and at work.
  • Easy access to safe and reliable birth control.

This war is not over and will not be over until women are seen and treated as equals to men. While that day has not come yet, it will come. We just have to keep working and fighting for it.

 

 

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Early Throwback Thursday Post-The Hour (2011-2013)

From the perspective of someone watching the news at home on the television, it seems like everything is smooth sailing. But like everything in life once the curtain is pulled back, what appears to be smooth sailing is actually rough waters.

The Hour aired for two seasons on BBC America. Starring Romola Garai, Ben Whishaw and Dominic West, The Hour was a behind the scenes look at a 1950’s news program in Britain. Integrating the chaos of running a daily news program with the chaos of the character’s private lives, The Hour was a fascinating drama that captivated viewers. Unfortunately, like many shows who are not given the chance to last, The Hour was only on the air for two years. Led by show-runner Abi Morgan (whose film credits include Shame and Suffragette), The Hour had potential, but the network did not see it that way.

I really enjoyed this show. It had great writing, great acting and contained a cast of British actors that Austen fans and fans of British drama will easily recognize.

I recommend it.

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Filed under Jane Austen, Television, Throwback Thursday, TV Review

Best & Worst Movies of 2015

2015 has been a good year for movies. With less than a week until 2016, I think it’s time to share my list of the best and worst movies of 2015.

Best Movies Of 2015

Star Wars: The Force Awakens & Brooklyn

If you asked me to choose between these two movies for top movies of the year, I honestly could not.  Star Wars: The Force  Awakens reminded me why I have been a fan since high school. It was everything that the first three films were and then some. Brooklyn was the perfect film. Fully formed characters, a plot that anyone can relate to, and of course, it takes place in my home town.

  Trumbo

Another surefire award winner, Trumbo is the story of screenwriter Dalton Trumbo (Bryan Cranston). One of the most respected and highest paid screenwriters in the 1940’s and 1950’s, Dalton Trumbo was part of the Hollywood Ten. Accused of being a communist, Trumbo is jailed and nearly forfeits his career.

Suffragette

Maud Watts (Carey Mulligan) is an ordinary woman who is pulled into the pre-World War I feminist movement in Britain. Choosing between her family and her new-found beliefs, Maud must make some hard decisions.  A reminder of why we still need the feminist movement, this film is a reminder of not just how far we have come, but how far we need to go.

Honorable Mentions Of 2015

Ricki and The Flash

Years ago, Ricki Randazzo (Meryl Streep) gave up the life of an ordinary suburban wife and mother to become a rock and roll singer. That plan has not worked out so well and Ricki must face the turmoil from her ex-husband and her children.

Pitch Perfect 2

Several years after the original movie, the girl are back.  When a performance does not go as planned and embarrasses the Bellas, Becca (Anna Kendrick) & Co must pull together and remind the rest of the world why they are the Barden Bellas.

Far From The Madding Crowd

Bathsheba Everdene (Carey Mulligan) has recently inherited her late uncle’s house and his fortune. Based on the book by Thomas Hardy, Bathsheba has no interest in marrying. But three men come forward who present her with a glimpse of what married life could be.

Worst Movies Of 2015

The Intern

In this new-age e-commerce film, Ben (Robert DeNiro) is a retiree with too much time on his hands. Jules (Anne Hathaway) is the owner of an online fashion company that is looking to senior interns. While the premise was interesting, the writing felt like it was lacking.

Macbeth

Macbeth (Michael Fassbender) is one of the most respected and well-known Shakespeare plays. That does not mean that it translates well to the screen every time. While the individual pieces of the film are fine, they don’t work together as  well as they should.

See you in 2016!

 

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Filed under Books, Feminism, History, Movie Review, Movies, Star Wars, William Shakespeare

Suffragette Review

There is an old saying: well-behaved women seldom make history.

The new movie, Suffragette is not only about women who made history, but changed history.

Maud Watts (Carey Mulligan) is an every woman. A member of the lower classes, she has spent most of her life working in a laundry. She is also, like many women of her era, a wife and mother. In the beginning of the film, Maud is simply trying to get by. She is aware of the feminist movement, but has no interest in joining the movement.

Then she is drawn in by Violet Miller (Anne-Marie Duff) and Edith Ellyn (Helena Bonham-Carter). Inspired by Mrs. Pankhurst (Meryl Streep) and Emily Davison (Natalie Press), Maud is drawn to the movement, but is torn between her new-found beliefs and her responsibility to her husband and her son.

I found this film to be nothing short of amazing (and hopefully award-winning). Mulligan as Maud, is not a member of the upper classes who decides to join the movement to fill up her empty day.  She is a working wife and mother who by the end of the film, understands that despite the costs, feminism was absolutely necessary. Combining fictional characters with real women and historical events, this film is a reminder of how far we have come, but also how far we need to go.

I absolutely recommend this film, especially if you are female. It will make you grateful and angry at the same time.

Suffragette is presently in theaters. 

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Sufragette-A Movie That Every Woman Must See

Suffragette opens  Friday.  This movie has been on my must see list for months. Here is why it should be on every moviegoers’ must see list.

  1. To appreciate the present, you must understand the past: For women under a certain age, the idea of going to school, getting a job and being independent (read i.e. single) before settling down and having a family is completely normal. We think nothing of extending our education as far as it can go or climbing the corporate ladder while maintaining the traditional life of marriage and motherhood. This idea is a relatively new one. It was an unspoken tradition that women’s education up until a few decades ago was minimal or non-existent. If a woman had the want or the financial need to work, the opportunities were limited, the working conditions were deplorable and the paycheck, compared to their male colleagues was pitiful.
  2. Women voting and having an active voice in their government is still a relatively new idea. American women have only been able to vote for 95 years. Other countries granted women the right to vote only a few decades ago.
  3. Women are still a minority in Hollywood: Many of the decision makers are men. Many of the directors and producers are men. A majority of the speaking roles are  written for male characters. This movie has a female centric plot, a female centric cast and production team made up of women. I hope and pray that this movie succeeds and proves once and for all the women’s voices in Hollywood are just as loud and capable as men.
  4. It reminds us why we still need feminism. Many of the issues that our fore-mothers were fighting for are still being fought for today.

Whether or not the movie is successful is to be seen. I hope and pray that it is.

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Full Suffragette Trailer

The full trailer for Suffragette is out.

It is another reminder of how far we have come and how far we need to go.

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June 5, 2015 · 9:25 pm

Suffragette Trailer

The trailer for the new movie Suffragette has been released. While it will not be arriving in American movie theaters for quite a few months, I have a feeling that this movie will inspire a whole new generation of women to right for their rights.

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April 15, 2015 · 5:31 pm