Tag Archives: The Bluest Eye

Books That Speak to the African-American Experience

It has been said that we can never know how another person sees the world until we walk a mile in their shoes. But books have a way to providing that perspective.

As our country and our culture once more grapples with racial tension and the troubled history of our mutual past, books may be one of the keys to bringing us together.

The Yellow House by Sarah Broom

The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

Becoming by Michelle Obama

Pride by Ibi Zoboi

Proud: My Fight For an Unlikely American Dream by Ibtihaj Muhammad

Joshua: A Brooklyn Tale by Andrew Kane

It may be simplistic to say that reading the books listed above or any book will help to solve our issues. However, I believe that by at least beginning to understand another’s perspective, the doors to communication, understanding, and diversity may truly start to open.

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Filed under Book Review, Books, History, Jane Austen, National News, New York City, Politics, Pride and Prejudice

The Bluest Eye Book Review

We all want to fit in. We all want to be loved, to be appreciated, to be accepted. But sometimes, as much as we wish it to happen, it may never happen.

The late Toni Morrison‘s debut novel, The Bluest Eye, was published in 1970. The main character in the book is Pecola Breedlove, a young African-American girl growing up in the 1930s and 1940s. Because of her complexion and the way that the rest of the world sees her, Pecola wants to be White. She wants to have blonde hair, blue eyes and fit in with the world around her.

As her wish becomes more fervent, her life begins to fall apart in ways that most, if not all of us, would find troubling.

If this book is not a mirror to our reality, I don’t know what is. Issues of race, class, and questions of who is considered to be beautiful bounce around this book like a painful ping pong ball. It is, I think, a necessary read because we are still wrestling with the same issues today that the characters are wrestling with decades ago.

I recommend it.

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