Tag Archives: The Tenant Of Wildfell Hall

Happy Birthday Anne Bronte!

During Anne Bronte‘s time, the expectations of woman’s life was simple: marry upon reaching adulthood, bring children (boys preferably) into the world, support her husband and live a quiet, appropriately feminine life. But Anne Bronte was not just any woman and she did not come just any family.

With her elder sisters Charlotte and Emily, Anne has become one of a handful of 19th century women writers whose influence has lasted long after her brief time on Earth. Her two novels, Agnes Grey and The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, speak to a woman’s condition and what she must endure because she is a woman.

Agnes Grey is about a young woman who works as a governess for wealthy families. Her charges are spoiled and wild, their parents do nothing to curb their bad behavior. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall is about spousal abuse, alcoholism and the choices that some women must make to remove themselves and their children from that environment.

The thing that I love about her books is that they are grounded in the real world, as a pose to the fantasy-ish world of her sister’s novels. An example of this is the romanticizing of Heathcliff in Emily’s Wuthering Heights. Upon the first read, Heathcliff is the romantic hero pining for Catherine Earnshaw. But Heathcliff reveals himself to be a brute and have serious anger issues.

In The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, Anne reveals the harsh truth of what it is to live with an abusive spouse. In her era, divorce was hard to come by and marriage was for life. Women were told to look the other way when their husbands acted less than honorably.

If there is one takeaway I have from both books, it is that the issues that she wrote about are still front and center today. Which is why Anne Bronte and her books are still being read today.

Wherever she is, I wish her a very happy birthday.

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The Bronte Myth Book Review

Among the great writers of the 19th century, the Bronte sisters stand tall. Lionized as proto-feminists and adored in the literary community for their contribution to the world of literature, fans sometimes have to ask themselves where fact ends and fiction begins.

In 2001, Lucasta Miller published The Bronte Myth. The book starts with the brief lives of the Charlotte, Emily and Anne Bronte and follows their posthumous celebrity as their image is shaped to fit the needs of the biographer. In the book, Ms. Miller delves deeply into the facts and the myths of the Brontes and how both have been used to tell the story of the legendary sisters.

When I heard about The Bronte Myth, the concept sounded interesting. I am sorry to report that the concept I had in my head did not meet reality.

The book is not for the casual or virgin Bronte fan. It borders on academic and is probably better suited for a reader who is well versed in the story of the Bronte sisters, their brother Branwell and father Patrick. But my main issue is that Ms. Miller spent most of the book talking about Charlotte. Granted, Charlotte lived the longest of her siblings, but the book is not entitled The Charlotte Bronte Myth. She spends about 60% of the book talking about Charlotte, 20% talking about Emily. The other 20% are given to Anne, Branwell and Patrick. I think I would have liked this book more if all of the Bronte siblings and their father were given equal attention.

Do I recommend it? Sort of.

 

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Happy Birthday Anne Bronte

Sometimes, when we make the decision to walk the path that is not walked by everyone else, we make history, even if we don’t know it at the time.

Anne Bronte was born on this day in 1820. The youngest of Patrick and Maria Bronte’s six children, she died at the young age of 29. In her lifetime, she completed two novels, Agnes Grey and The Tenant Of Wildfell Hall.

While she is often not given the respect and name recognition that goes to her elder sisters, Charlotte and Emily, her writing is on par with her sisters. Writing about every day life in Victorian England, her writing stands out because she spoke of the truth of what it was to be a woman in the period. In Agnes Grey, she wrote about a woman whose respectable career choices were severely limited and must work as a governess to support herself and her family. Agnes’s charges are spoiled and their parents are apathetic to their children’s behavior. In Tenant Of Wildfell Hall, a woman arrives in a small rural town, presenting herself as a widow with a young son. The truth about her identity made a small, but important dent in the worldwide women’s movement that is still being felt today.

As a writer and a proto-feminist, Anne Bronte, along with her sisters, helped to pave the way for women and women writers that continues to be felt a century and a half after her untimely passing.

Wherever you are, Anne Bronte, happy birthday.

 

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To Walk Invisible Review

The key elements of a successful biopic, especially one where the subjects are legendary in their own right, are as follows: a compelling narrative and adherence to the facts of the subject’s life to engage both the novice viewer and the viewer who is well versed on the subject’s life.

On Sunday night, PBS aired To Walk Invisible, a biopic of the Brontes. The Reverend Patrick Bronte (Jonathan Pryce) is a widower living with his surviving children, who are all grown and seem to be flailing emotionally. The eldest daughter, Charlotte (Finn Atkins) is passionate and ambitious. Branwell, the only boy (Adam Nagaitis) is the ne’er-do-well dreamer with the growing alcohol addiction. Emily (Chloe Pirrie) is as fiery as she is private. The baby of the family, Anne (Charlie Murphy) is the peace maker.

As the sisters work towards their dream of becoming published authors, Branwell descends rapidly into a haze of grief and addiction that will overtake the entire family.

Anyone who knows me (or has read this blog), knows that I worship the literary ground that the Brontes walk on. Their books are nothing short of genius. Unfortunately, I cannot say that same about this television movie. Granted, it is one shot, 2 hour television movie, so for timing reasons, cannot contain every moment of their lives. That’s not my issue.

My issue is that it went a little too fast and the ending felt very abrupt. Certain facts (which I will not mention here due to the fact that they are a little spoiler-y for novice Bronte fans) were not mentioned. Not only that, but the narrative spent too much time on Branwell and not enough time on his sisters, who are the main characters.

Do I recommend it? As much as I would love to say an enthusiastic yes, I can’t. I have to give a mere maybe.

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To Walk Invisible Trailer

A good biopic is hard to come by. On one hand, it has to be true to the real life subjects that are being portrayed on-screen. But, on the other hand, it must be entertaining and keep the audience engaged.

To Walk Invisible is the new biopic based on the life Emily, Anne and Charlotte Bronte. Stepping into the roles of the the legendary sisters are Charlie Murphy (Anne Bronte), Chloe Pirrie (Emily Bronte) and Finn Atkins (Charlotte Bronte). Playing their widower father Patrick is Jonathan Pryce and their brilliant but drug addicted brother, Branwell is Adam Nagaitis.

While there is no official air date in the US (it premieres in the UK on December 29th), I have a feeling the bookworms, anglophiles and Bronte fans will be pleased with this fictional imaging of the three of the world’s greatest authors.

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Worlds of Ink and Shadow: A Novel of the Brontës Book Review

Among the many anecdotes and suggestions about writing, one of the most common is “write what you know”.

In the case of Anne, Emily and Charlotte Bronte, they knew a world of fantasy and drama that was far from the dreary, isolated Yorkshire town they called home. Raised by their widower parson father who some might have referred to during their lifetimes as eccentric, the young Miss Bronte’s and their brother Branwell developed a keen imagination and a heightened reality narrative style that the would become the backbone of the novels that the girls would write as adults.

Lena Coakley’s new book,  Worlds of Ink and Shadow: A Novel of the Brontës, takes the reader back into the teenage years and the juvenalia that would later become the classic novels Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights, Agnes Grey and The Tenant Of Wildfell Hall. Wrapped in the fantasy worlds that the Brontes created as children, their characters within these worlds come to life and interact with their creators. 

As a reader and a writer, to know where other writers have started is always fascinating, especially when it comes to the writers like the Brontes, who have become giants in the world of literature.

But, this book is not all peaches and cream. The beginning is a little slow for my taste. While Ms. Coakley has certainly done her research, a reader who is not familiar with the Brontes might not finish the book. A little too steep in Bronte mythology and juvenalia, the book is strictly for Bronte fans.

Do I recommend it? I would say yes, but I adore their books. Otherwise, I would stay away.

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You Might Be A Bronte Fan If…..

You might be a Bronte Fan if…..

  • You own and/or have seen several filmed adaptations of the novels.
  • You own and or/have read all of their novels.
  • You own and/or have read biographies or fictional stories based on the lives of the Brontes.
  • You  are annoyed when Charlotte and Emily are mentioned, but Anne is not.
  • If you are a straight female or a gay man, you fantasize about Edward Rochester or Heathcliff.
  • Visiting Haworth, the Bronte Parsonage, Haddon Hall, and/or the Moors is on your travel bucket list.
  • You mourn over dead leaves.
  • You follow the careers of the actors who have played Bronte characters, even if some of their post-Bronte choice of roles were questionable.
  • You can easily rank your favorite adaptations of the novels and the actors who played the various characters.
  • You saw the Jane Eyre musical.

  • Your annoyed when people confuse any of Brontes with Jane Austen. Jane Austen is not the sequel or the prequel to Jane Eyre.
  • You side with Emily Bronte in the debate about who is a better writer.

  • You were thrilled when you assigned to read one of the novels in school.
  • And finally, every time you finish one of their novels, you silently thank them for being bold enough to share their genius with the rest of the world.

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Dear Mrs. Rice

Dear Mrs. Rice

I’m sorry to hear that your personal life is now front page news and your husband’s career may now be over.

However, I believe that this becoming front page news is a good thing.

You are not the last woman, nor are you the very first woman to be abused by a spouse or romantic partner.

You should read Anne Bronte’s novel, The Tenant Of Wildfell Hall. It’s about a woman in Victorian era England who makes the difficult choice to leave her abusive husband and start a new life with her son under a new identity.

Unlike Victorian England, women who are experiencing abuse from their partners have rights. There are laws to protect you. You can walk away from this man and move on with your life. Helen Huntington did not have that option.

I can’t tell you what to  do. Only you can make that choice.  I can only say that there are millions of women in this country who are in your shoes and who may look to you for answers.

Sincerely

Another woman

 

 

 

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The Tenant Of Wildfell Hall (Book And Movie Review)

When referring to the Bronte’s, many will often refer only to Charlotte and Emily, leaving the youngest Bronte, Anne out of the picture.

Anne may not be as popular as her elder sisters. But her novels speak the truth about life, in her time and our time, without relying one the more dramatic story telling that exists in Jane Eyre or Wuthering Heights.

Published in 1848, The Tenant Of Wildfell Hall  is the story of two different characters whose lives will eventually intertwine.

Gilbert Markham is a gentleman farmer in rural England and a sought after potential husband by several of the unattached young women in area. A mysterious widow, Mrs. Graham, has recently rented Wildfell Hall.  She is unknown to the people in the town, who turn to gossip when she is not so eager to share her past. In reality, she is not a widow, but a young wife, escaping from an abusive marriage with her young son and faithful servant.

In 1996, the book was adapted into a TV movie with Toby Stephens as Gilbert, Tara Fitzgerald as Mrs. Graham and Rupert Graves as the unknown, but abusive husband.

What I enjoy about the book and the movie is that the story is timeless. How many of us has fallen for prince or princess charming and soon after discovered their not so charming qualities?  In the 1840’s, marriage was till death do us part. Divorce was rare and if it did happen, it created a scandal.  Thankfully, we have laws in place today that protect those trying to get out of abusive relationships.  At the same time, it is still extremely common to hear about people who have been injured or died at the hands of their romantic partners.

I recommend this book and movie not just because both are extremely good, but as a reminder of both how far we have come and how far we need to go.

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