Tag Archives: Timeless

Timeless Character Review: Emma Whitmore

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series Timeless. Read at your own risk if you have not watched the first two seasons.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

In this series of weekly blog posts, I will examine character using the characters from Timeless to explore how writers can create fully dimensional, human characters that audiences and readers can relate to.

Commitment is defined as the following:

“The state or quality of being dedicated to a cause, activity, etc.”

If one were to look up the definition of commitment in the dictionary, they would see the face of Emma Whitmore (Annie Wersching). Emma was originally a double agent, working for Mason Industries while revealing the secrets of her job to Rittenhouse. When her secret was revealed, Emma joined Rittenhouse and never looked back.

The audience and the Time Team met Emma after she had faked her death and spent several years living in Missouri in the 19th century. Emma is a tireless foot soldier for Rittenhouse, willing to do anything and everything that is needed to ensure that her teams wins.  Not above violence when needed, she is smart, strong and is more than able to take care of herself. But that does not mean that she is without weakness.

Angry and jealous that Lucy is higher in the hierarchy of Rittenhouse due to an accident of birth, Emma takes great pleasure in torturing Lucy whenever she can. However, she is not all bad. In certain instances, she has let history take its course instead of following her instructions to the letter.

To sum it up: A character who is committed to his or her cause is a great starting point for their story arc. But there has to be more than this commitment. Emma is a good example of this because though she usually follows the dictates of Rittenhouse,  there are moments when she does not follow orders. Her jealousy of Lucy and the rare times when she does acquience to history creates a well-rounded character that the audience can relate to, even if they disagree with her actions.

P.S. It’s nice to see a badass redhead on screen, even if she is one of the baddies.

This will probably be my last Character Review post for 2018. I have not decided if I will start a new list of characters next week or wait until after the New Year. Either way, stay tuned and keep watching for new posts. You maybe surprised who I review. 

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Timeless Character Review: Connor Mason

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series Timeless. Read at your own risk if you have not watched the first two seasons.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

In this series of weekly blog posts, I will examine character using the characters from Timeless to explore how writers can create fully dimensional, human characters that audiences and readers can relate to.

When one usually sees a business owner on film or on television, he or she is usually the villain. More concerned with making money and keeping their business alive than tending to the needs of their staff, they are willing to do anything to ensure that the bottom line is kept to their standards. In Timeless, that business owner is Connor Mason (Paterson Joseph). Connor is the founder of Mason Industries, the company that has built the time machine that the Time Team uses to travel through time.

A mentor to Rufus Carlin (Malcolm Barrett), Connor got involved with Rittenhouse when they helped him resolve his financial issues. This led to Connor forcing Rufus to secretly conversations with the rest of the Time Team to help Rittenhouse. His conscious finally got the best of his two timing when he took the blame for an explosion that was caused by Rittenhouse.

After the explosion, Connor is humbled and has to live without the money and the fame that came with his previous life.

To sum it up: There is an old saying: pride goeth before the fall. Connor Mason, the hotshot inventor and millionaire businessman thought he was all that. Then he realized that he was not all that. His dealings with Rittenhouse put the entire Time Team in danger and destroyed what he worked hard to achieve.  But, in the end, he realized that there is more to life than business and making money. As preachy as it sounds, the concept of appreciating the simpler things in life and appreciating those who love you will never disappear.

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Timeless Character Review: Agent Denise Christopher

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series Timeless. Read at your own risk if you have not watched the first two seasons.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

In this series of weekly blog posts, I will examine character using the characters from Timeless to explore how writers can create fully dimensional, human characters that audiences and readers can relate to.

Every team needs a level-headed, capable leader. They are the ones who keep calm when everything and everyone around them is falling apart around them. On Timeless, that leader is Agent Denise Christopher (Sakina Jaffrey). Responsible for bringing and keeping the Time Team together, she is the unquestioned leader of their group. Part mama bear and part military general, it up to her to ensure that the missions are completed and Rittenhouse is stopped. But she also has to deal with the administrative part of leadership, working with Mason Industries and the her bosses in the NSA.

Like many working women, Denise juggles both a work life and a home life. Married too Michelle (Marci T. House), she has two young kids. But while her home life looks flawless, it was not easy to come out. When the Time Team met her in the early 1980’s, a younger Denise Christopher (Karen David) came from a traditional Indian family. Working as a police officer, she kept her sexuality close to her chest and nearly married a man to please her family.

To sum it up: Like anyone in a management, Denise Christopher’s professional life is a balancing act between caring for her team and making sure that they can complete the job they were hired to do. Add in her home life and you’ve got the average working woman. Any woman with a full-time job, a partner/spouse and children will tell you that it is never easy. But Denise Christopher stands out as a character because she balances both and proves that even though it is not easy, it is still possible.

 

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Timeless Character Review: Garcia Flynn

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series Timeless. Read at your own risk if you have not watched the first two seasons.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

In this series of weekly blog posts, I will examine character using the characters from Timeless to explore how writers can create fully dimensional, human characters that audiences and readers can relate to.

Any good story needs a villain. He or she is often the driving force for the narrative, especially when they come into contact with the hero or heroine of the story. But a good villain is there not just to antagonize the main character(s), he or she has a back story and believes that they are doing the right thing.

In Timeless, the villain for all of season 1 and part of season 2 was Garcia Flynn (Goran Visnijc). When the audience is introduced to Flynn, we are told that he is the bad guy. Determined to stop Rittenhouse, Flynn uses a journal written in the future by Lucy Preston (Abigail Spencer). It is up to the Time Team to prevent Flynn from changing major events in American history.

Over the course of season one and season two, it is revealed that Flynn’s family were murdered by Rittenhouse. In the second season, Flynn becomes an ally of the Time Team, in spite of their lack of trust in him, especially Wyatt (Matt Lanter). When Wyatt’s wife, Jessica (Tonya Glanz) returns from the dead and sparks appear to be flying between Lucy and Flynn, this arouses Wyatt’s suspicion even further.

To sum it up: It takes a good writer to create a complicated villain. To be evil for evil’s sake is boring. When a villain has a motive, it only adds to the narrative. Garcia Flynn stands out as a villain because the audience understands why he is doing what he is doing.

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Timeless Character Review: Jiya

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series Timeless. Read at your own risk if you have not watched the first two seasons.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

In this series of weekly blog posts, I will examine character using the characters from Timeless to explore how writers can create fully dimensional, human characters that audiences and readers can relate to.

Behind every team in the field is a support system who is not in the field, but is as important as those on site. On Timeless, Jiya (Claudia Doumit) started out as the person behind the controls while Lucy, Wyatt and Rufus travel through time. Then she takes Rufus’s (Malcolm Barrett) place after he is injured, though her piloting skills are not as strong as Rufus’s. 

After passing out from what is thought to be the effects of time travel, Jiya discovers that she has visions and can predict the future. This causes her to break away emotionally from Rufus and their relationship, in an effort to protect him. 

 

To sum it up: Every major character is important, regardless of their time on the page or the screen. Jiya is important, not only because she holds the fort down, but because her abilities and the information she provides helps her colleagues to do their jobs. As writers,one of our jobs is to ensure that all of our characters receive  appropriate time in the limelight. We cannot forget some of them because they are not always in the foreground.

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Timeless Character Review: Rufus Carlin

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series Timeless. Read at your own risk if you have not watched the first two seasons.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

In this series of weekly blog posts, I will examine character using the characters from Timeless to explore how writers can create fully dimensional, human characters that audiences and readers can relate to.

Every ship needs a captain and every crew needs a conscious. In Timeless, the captain of the Lifeboat is Rufus Carlin (Malcolm Barrett). Rufus is an engineer and programmer who is assigned to pilot the time machine. He is also the conscious of the main trio of characters, due mostly to his skin color and the heavy reminder of racism in America. Rufus also dealt with betrayal when his mentor reveals that he was not kidnapped, he willingly joined up with the villain and made it look like a kidnapping.

But there is light in Rufus’s life. His relationship with girlfriend Jiya (Claudia Doumit) is going strong. They were colleagues before they got together, Rufus had a crush on Jiya for a long time, but was unable to give voice to his feelings.

To sum it up: When a character is the conscious of the story, he or she does not need to be 2D, dull or preachy. Rufus works as a character because though he is the conscious of the show, he is thoroughly human. As an audience member, we root for him when he stands up against racism, we love him when it comes to his relationship with Jiya and and we feel his pain when his mentor is revealed as a traitor. That is why Rufus Carlin stands out as a character.

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Timeless Character Review: Wyatt Logan

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series Timeless. Read at your own risk if you have not watched the first two seasons.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

In this series of weekly blog posts, I will examine character using the characters from Timeless to explore how writers can create fully dimensional, human characters that audiences and readers can relate to.

When one meets a member of the military, there is a certain expectation of who this person is. Especially if this person is male. On the battlefield, they are on the front lines, ready to fight. But when they return to civilian life, things are not as simple.

Wyatt Logan (Matt Lanter) is the brawn of the time team. Before traveling through time to save American history, he was part of the Delta Force. When it comes to battle, Wyatt is in his element. He has no problem stepping in and using force to keep the Lucy (Abigail Spencer) and Rufus (Malcolm Barrett) safe. But underneath that warrior shell is a deep personal loss that motivates Wyatt to fight.

Prior to joining the time team, Wyatt’s wife was murdered. He blamed himself and got lost in a haze of grief. Though he continued to put his marriage and his late wife on a pedestal, Wyatt revealed that their marriage was on shaky ground.

As Wyatt spent more time with Lucy and Rufus, he began to heal. He also fell in love with Lucy and she with him. But then, his wife was brought back to life and Wyatt was forced to make a choice. If that was not enough, his wife revealed that she worked for the enemy and everything in Wyatt’s world turned upside down once again.

To sum it up: Creating a character is about balance. Wyatt works as a character because he is both a bad ass soldier and a man dealing with complicated emotions. Both intertwine to create a character who is complicated, human and speaks to the audience.

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Timeless Character Review: Lucy Preston

The new group of characters I will be reviewing is…the characters from Timeless.

*Warning: This post contains spoilers about the characters from the television series Timeless. Read at your own risk if you have not watched the first two seasons.

There is something to be said about a well written, human character. They leap off the page and speak to us as if they were right in front us, as flesh and blood human beings, instead of fictional creations.

In this series of weekly blog posts, I will examine character using the characters from Timeless to explore how writers can create fully dimensional, human characters that audiences and readers can relate to.

There is a myth about smart girls. She has the brains, but not the looks or the social intelligence. In Timeless, Lucy Preston (Abigail Spencer) breaks that myth entirely. Lucy is a history professor who is hired by a private organization to join a team that will travel through time and stop a terrorist from changing history.  The other members of the team are Wyatt Logan (Matt Lanter), a former member of the military and Rufus Carlin (Malcolm Barrett), a scientist who is also in charge of piloting the time machine.

Though Lucy is the brains of the outfit, she is not the damsel in distress and not seen as less than compared to her male colleagues. Lucy is smart, tough and can roll with the punches. She also has an interesting relationship with Wyatt, which starts off as strictly business, but becomes more complicated as they get to know each other.

To sum it up: When it comes to how women are portrayed on the page and on the screen, they are often put into a box and kept in the box over the course of the narrative. Lucy Preston stepped out of the box in the first episode and never looked back. Though she is smart, she is not just relegated to the smart girl box. She is thoroughly capable of being part of the team and able to stand on her own two feet.

Writers, whether they know it or not, can change the world. The writing team behind Timeless understands this, especially when it comes to how women are portrayed and seen in popular media. In creating Lucy, they are not only changing the fictional world in Timeless, but helping to advance women in the real world to real and lasting equality.

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Reasons To Save Timeless

Timeless is one of my favorite shows that is presently airing on NBC. It was initially cancelled after the first season, then brought back to life after the network was bombarded by fans who wanted the show to continue. The second season will soon be coming to a close and unfortunately, once again, Timeless on the verge of cancellation.

If you have not watched the show, listed below are the reasons to watch and save timeless.

  1. Fully fleshed out, empowered and intelligent female characters: Lucy Preston (Abigail Spencer), Agent Denise Christopher (Sakina Jeffrey), Jiya (Claudia Doumit) and Emma Whitmore (Annie Wersching) are far more than the traditional arm candy/love interest/damsel in distress. All are badass, in charge and are just as important to the overall narrative as the male characters.
  2. Every episode is a mini history lesson. The pilot episode was about the Hindenburg disaster. I knew the basic facts about the disaster, but I learned a lot more by the time the episode was over.
  3. The action and drama keep the audience on their toes. I’ve often found myself wanting commercial breaks because I was so anxious to know what was going to happen after the break.
  4. The baddie on show is an organization called Rittenhouse. They are determined to bend history to their will and are not unwilling to kill or destroy in the process.
  5. The focus this season is overlooked historical figures who are female and people of color. It’s not often that a fictional action show shines the spotlight on these people. The first episode of this season focused around Marie Curie. It was enlightening to say the least.
  6. It’s an amazing show. I hope and pray that once again NBC will listen to the fans and renew Timeless for a third season.

 

 

Timeless airs 10PM on Sunday nights on NBC. The season finale airs in two parts, May 11th and May 18th starting at 9pm. 

 

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Lucy Preston, A New Heroine For Our Era

The glass ceiling is cracking. Every crack, regardless of its size is important.

Three weeks ago, NBC introduced audiences to a new television show and a new heroine. The new series Timeless, is a science fiction/history mashup about a group of unlikely heroes who must go back in time to prevent history from being altered.

Lucy Preston, played by Abigail Spencer is the female lead. Lucy is the academic and the historian of the group. Her job is to make sure that the history, as we know it today remains as such.

Lucy is a new kind of heroine. She is smart, capable and is not treated differently by her male colleagues because she is a woman. She represents how far women have come, not just in television, but in our overall culture.

While there are still more fully developed male characters than fully developed female characters on both the big and small screen, it’s nice to see that characters like Lucy are being created and presented to audiences. We need more characters like her.

Timeless is my new favorite show of the fall season and I absolutely recommend it.

Timeless airs Monday nights at 10PM on NBC.

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