Tag Archives: Tracee Ellis Ross

Tracee Ellis Ross’ Children’s Book for Handsy Men

Sometimes it seems like some grown men have the maturity of a toddler.  Talking to them like grownups gets us nowhere. We need to talk to them on a level that they understand.

Enter Tracee Ellis Ross, who is guess hosting on Jimmy Kimmel Live this week. The video below is brilliant, funny and hits the point home. No means no, means no. End of story. If you don’t understand the word no, just watch the news and see the men whose professional and personal lives have been destroyed because they didn’t understand the meaning of the word. It’s not exactly a path in life that someone would actively choose to take, if they understood the meaning of the word.

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Filed under Feminism, Television

Tracee Ellis Ross On Being A Single Woman

It’s hard to be a single woman, even in 2017. Though our accomplishments are astounding, two questions always come up: when are you getting married and when are you having children?

Actor Tracee Ellis Ross, star of the sitcom Black-ish and daughter of music legend Diana Ross is a single woman. At the age of 45, she has neither a husband or a child. Recently, she spoke at the Glamour’s 2017 Women of the Year Summit about being a single woman.

Her speech is nothing short of amazing and inspiring.  The truth is that for most of human history, from the time a girl was born, she was told in every way possible that how she is viewed depends on whether or not she has a man. Being single is a fate worse than death.

In Emma, Jane Austen made the following comment about single women:

“Single women have a dreadful propensity for being poor. Which is one very strong argument in favor of matrimony.”

The fact is that doors that were unquestionably open to men in regards to education, career and opportunities to go beyond the boundaries of hearth and home have only recently been kicked open by women.  But there is still one more door to kick down: the idea that a woman’s worth, despite who she is and what she has accomplished, is strictly based upon if she has a ring on her finger and a child at her feet.  A man’s worth is not judged by these factors, why must be women be judged by these factors?

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Filed under Books, Emma, Feminism, History, Jane Austen, Music, Television