Tag Archives: Transgender

Throwback Thursday-Harry Potter Film Series (2001-2011)

There is something about the magic of a favorite childhood book. No matter how old one gets or how complicated adulting becomes, these books will always stay with us.

The Harry Potter film series (2001-2011) is one of the few book to movie transitions that is both true to the source material and has the ability to stay with the audience.

The films follow the title character, Harry Potter (Daniel Radcliffe), an orphaned boy who discovers that he is a wizard. Over the course of ten years and eight films, Harry and his friends, Hermoine Granger (Emma Watson) and Ron Weasley (Rupert Grint), grow up, fall in love and fight against the dark forces of their world.

If there is one thing that stands out to me, it is that the narrative and characters feel human and normal against an extraordinary backdrop. Harry is an everyman type of character, giving readers and viewers an emotional hook to grab onto and stay with until the very end.

Do I recommend them? Yes.

P.S. I would love to just talk about the films, but I must address J.K. Rowling‘s morally disgusting remarks about Trans men and women. They are a stain on the legacy of the books/movies that inspired a generation of readers.

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Filed under Books, Movie Review, Movies, Throwback Thursday

Anne Frank, George Floyd and Dominique “Rem’mie” Fells: Killed by Hate

I think it is pretty safe to say that in the nearly three weeks since George Floyd was killed in Minneapolis, the world has changed. Across the globe, millions are making their voices heard. George Floyd was one man, but he has come to stand for those who have been killed by hate.

Yesterday would have been Anne Frank‘s 91st birthday. Her diary has been ready by millions of readers over the last 70ish years. Like George Floyd, she has become a symbol of a life cute short by hate.

Among the issues that have been brought to the forefront is that Americans of color who also identify as transgender are being killed at an alarming rate. On June 9th, Dominique “Rem’mie” Fells was murdered in Philadelphia. If this was not enough to make one’s blood boil, you know who has decided to roll back health protections for transgender Americans. Considering that it both Pride month and yesterday was also the 4th anniversary of the Pulse Nightclub Shooting in Orlando, this rollback feels particularly painful.

I keep thinking that if the world had collectively protested in the 1930’s as they do now, would the Holocaust have happened? How many might have survived? Unfortunately, this question can never be answered.

I wish that we lived in a world in which our rights were immediately given to us at birth. I wish that we were not categorized and then based on that category, denied or approved for where we may end up in life. But that is the world we live in. But until that day in which that happens, we must continue to stand up and fight for those rights.

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Filed under Books, History, National News, Politics

Becoming Eve: My Journey from Ultra-Orthodox Rabbi to Transgender Woman Book Review

No matter how old we are, we still want our parent’s love and affection. But what happens we have to make a choice between our parent’s love and our authentic selves?

The new book, Becoming Eve: My Journey from Ultra-Orthodox Rabbi to Transgender Woman, is a memoir written by Abby Chava Stein. Abby was born a boy, the eldest son of a large Hasidic Jewish family in New York City. A direct descendant of the Baal Shem Tov, the expectations on her shoulders as a child were clear. She would follow in the personal and professional path of those who came before her.

But something inside of her said that she was different. In her 20’s, after marrying and having a child, Abby knew that it was time to be herself. Even if that meant being estranged from the family and the community that she grew up in.

I loved this book because the author lays it all on the page. It is an honest, heartfelt, sometimes painful memoir of a time in her life when she was living as two different people. Though Ms. Stein comes from a specific community with a specific faith, her story is universal. There are many of us in this world who live two lives. We know at some point, we must come out of the closet, in whatever form that takes.

If she can do it, so can the rest of us.

I recommend it.

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Filed under Book Review, Books, New York City

The Rights of Transgender Americans Are About to be Taken Away

The reality of gender and sexuality is that neither can easily fit into a box. But some people still believe that gender and sexuality are binary and limited to two boxes: male and female. Anyone who does not fall into these specific boxes is therefore an other.

The administration of the current resident in The White House is considering a proposal to define sex and sexuality. Any protections and rights that those who identify as transgender could be potentially stripped away.

I am not only bothered as an American, but on a personal level. As an American, I am bothered that the inalienable rights of my fellow citizens are being denied because they don’t fit into someone else’s too neat box. I am bothered on a personal level because I have a relation who is near and dear to me who identifies as transgender. To know that this person would be denied their rights because of who they are not only breaks my heart, but makes me angry.

The midterm elections are coming in two weeks. As citizens, we have a responsibility to vote to ensure that all citizens, regardless of labels are not denied their rights. No one should be denied their unalienable rights because they don’t fit into the neat little boxes of others.

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Filed under National News, Politics

Waste

Warning: This post reveals spoilers of this week’s episode of Law and Order: Special Victims Unit. If you have not seen the episode, I will not be offended if you do not read any further.

The premise of the episode is as follows: A transgender teen Avery Parker (Christopher Dylan) is taunted and attacked by a group of African-American teenagers.  After sustaining traumatic injuries, he passes away from his injuries. One of the young men who attacked him, Darius McCrae (Dante Brown), is being tried as an adult for the crime.

The question posed around the squad room is a difficult one. Darius is only fifteen, should he be tried as an adult or as a juvenile?

What struck me about this episode was that hate is a waste. It is a waste of time, of breath, of life.  The end result was that Darius was tried as an adult and his crime was labelled as a hate crime. He would not be a free man until he was in his 20’s.

There was no reason for Avery to die and Darius to spend his formative years in prison. In the end, two lives were forever changed and two families have to face the reality of the loss of their child.

I hope it was worth it. It feels like a waste to me.

 

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Filed under Life, Television