The Shooting in Buffalo is a Shit Storm of Everything That is Wrong With This Country

Saturday morning started as out as a normal day. For the residents of Buffalo in upstate NY, it became a day marked by grief and horror. A gunman walked into a grocery store and started shooting. By the time he was apprehended, ten people were dead, and three were injured.

The accused (whose name will not be mentioned on this blog) is an eighteen-year-old Caucasian boy. According to the police, his intention was to murder as many African-Americans as he could. Only two of the victims were not POC. Upon further digging, law enforcement officials discovered a manifesto in which he also believed the antisemitic bullshit.

To make matter worse, he had previous mental health issues and was able to evade the laws that prevented him from legally buying a firearm. If that was not enough, he lived streamed the massacre. As much as I appreciate the upsides of social media, the companies that run these platforms have some serious work and soul searching to do.

Everything that is wrong with this country is represented by the event on Saturday and the person accused of perpetrating it. There are many who would have no restrictions at all when it comes to firearms, but they will do everything in their power to control a woman’s/pregnant person’s body and their right to choose if/when they become a parent. They also turn a blind eye to the hate coming out of the right-wing press and the politicians who prefer power over respecting democracy, political norms, and the rule of law.

I don’t know what it is going to take to shake us out of this dream world that we live in. I fear that when we do, it will be too late.

May the memories of those killed on Saturday be a blessing. Z”L.

P.S. There were five mass shootings across the country this past weekend. How many people are going to die before we do something about this once and for all?

Little White Lie Movie Review

Growing up, Lacey Schwartz felt like an outsider. Raised in upstate New York by Caucasian Jewish parents, she never felt like she fit in. It was obvious, though unspoken that Lacey was different. Enrolling in Georgetown University, Lacey received an invitation to join the Black Student Union. The problem was that Lacey had always thought that she was white. Accepting the invitation, Lacey used the opportunity to discover who she is and ultimately, make peace with the questions she has been wrestling with since childhood.

Ms. Schwartz tells her story in the documentary Little White Lie.

I found this documentary to be compelling. There were questions of race, religion, identity and finding your way in the world. While we all have our paths in life to walk on, these questions are universal.

I highly recommend this documentary.

 

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