POTUS: Or, Behind Every Great Dumbass Are Seven Women Trying to Keep Him Alive Play Review

Women have always done the behind-the-scenes work. But while the men get the accolades, the women are ignored and their work is minimized.

The new Broadway play, POTUS, by Selina Fillinger, puts the spotlight on seven women who are the real power behind the throne. Or, in this case, the President of the United States. The story starts when during an event, POTUS (who is only seen from the waist down) refers to Margaret, aka FLOTUS (Vanessa Williams) via a word I will not repeat on this blog.

Harriet (Julie White) is the chief of staff who is trying to keep the resulting chaos at bay. Jean (Suzy Nakamura) is the press secretary who is doing everything she can to answer the barrage of questions. Stephanie (Rachel Dratch) is the mousy secretary trying to boost her confidence.

Chris (Lilli Cooper) is the journalist balancing work and motherhood (complete with breast pumps). Bernadette (Lea Delaria) is POTUS’s wayward sister with a not-so-clean past. Dusty (Julianne Hough) is a young lady who might be POTUS’s sidepiece.

Together, these women must tamp down on the scandal and save the leader of the free world.

The best way to describe the play is a feminist political farcical screwball comedy. All of the performers are at the top of their game. The physical gags provoke nothing short of gut-busting laughter. Woven into the comedy are issues that are, unfortunately, still too prevalent, even in 2022.

It is one of the funniest plays that I have seen in a long time. I would, in fact, see it again, if it had not already closed.

Do I recommend it? Absolutely. If it goes on tour at some point, I highly recommend that you run, not walk to the box office.

POTUS: Or, Behind Every Great Dumbass Are Seven Women Trying to Keep Him Alive closed in New York City on August 14th.

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Throwback Thursday-The Courage To Love (2000)

Our strongest sense is sometimes not our sense of smell or taste, but our gut. When we have nothing else to guide us, our gut will.

In the 2000 television movie, The Courage To Love, Henriette Delille (Vanessa Williams) is a biracial woman living in 19th century New Orleans. While her parents are in love, they cannot marry due to the fact that her father is white and her mother is black. Dr. Gerard Gaultier (Gil Bellows), a Caucasian doctor from France proposes to Henriette and take her back to France, where there would be no opposition to their marriage. But Henriette is devoted to the Church and must choose between saying I do and joining the Church.

As interesting as this television movie is, it is a little heavy-handed. It comes out more preachy than entertaining while teaching.

Do I recommend it? I have to lean toward no.

Late Flashback Friday- Christmas Edition Part II: A Diva’s Christmas Carol (2000)

Among Christmas stories, there are few that are on par with Charles Dicken’s A Christmas Carol. There is a reason why the story of an old miser who learns the true meaning of the season has resonated with audiences since 1843.

It’s easy to see why the story has been adapted many times over since then.

In 2000, A Diva’s Christmas Carol hit the small screen. Ebony Scrooge (Vanessa Williams) is a diva with a capitol D. While her career has been soaring, she treats her band and her manager like sh*t. Just before a performance in New York, Ebony is visited by the spirit of her late band member Marli Jacob (Chilli of TLC fame). Marli warns of the impending visit of three spirits. If Ebony does not heed the warning of the spirits, the consequences could be dire.

This version of A Christmas Carol is cute. There is nothing really intellectually stimulating about this tv movie, but it’s not completely horrible either.

Do I recommend it? Yes.

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