Will And Grace And The 2016 Election

Last night, the cast of Will And Grace released a short reunion episode. The name of the episode is Hot Food and it was all about the election.

The last episode of Will And Grace aired 10 years ago. It was as if the show never went off the air. It was funny, it was brilliant and it was completely relevant.

I want more.

Happy Tuesday.

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Filed under Politics, Television

Rosh Hashanah

This coming Sunday, Jews around the world will be celebrating the holiday of Rosh Hashanah.

For me, this Rosh Hashanah is about rest, family and introspection. I’ve been through a lot since last fall and have made more than my fair share of mistakes along the way. The emotional bruises are plenty. Some bruises have healed, other are just as raw as they were when they appeared. I’ve been knocked down more times than I can count. But I picked myself up, brushed myself up and I kept going.

I will also be looking forward to the rest and spending time with my family. Sometimes we just need to stop and take a deep breath. Rosh Hashanah is that deep breath.

For those who celebrate, have a happy and sweet new year.

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The 9/11 Museum

Museums are supposed to be educational and illuminating. That does not mean that they cannot be engaging. Or that they can’t induce tears.

A little more than ten years after September 11th, 2001, the 9/11 Memorial Museum opened to the public. Built on the site of the Twin Towers, the museum is a living memorial to the victims of both the September 11th attacks and the attack in 1993. Containing artifacts from the ruins, multimedia installations, pictures of the victims and the everyday of objects belonging to those who survived and/or perished, this museum stands out among the museums in New York City.


Walking into this museum is like walking into a time capsule. It is also like walking in a tomb. While there are parts of the exhibit that are heartbreaking, there are also parts that remind us that life does go on and while we will never forget, we can heal.

I absolutely recommend it, for both locals and visitors.

The museum is located at 180 Greenwich St in New York City.

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Filed under New York City, History

Karolina’s Twins Book Review

War can cause us to do things that we might not do in times of peace.

In the new novel, Karolina’s Twins, by Ronald H. Balson, the married couple (and soon to be first time parents) private investigator Liam Taggart and lawyer Catherine Lockhart are presented with an intriguing case. Lena Woodward (née Scheinman) is an elderly Holocaust survivor with a decades old secret.

Lena needs Liam and Catherine to help her keep a promise to a dying friend. Before the war, Lena and Karolina were best friends. But the war and the invading Nazis changed everything. In the ghetto, Karolina finds herself pregnant and needs a way to ensure that her children will live. She does only what a mother in desperate times would do. With her dying breath, Karoline asked Lena to find her children. While Lena is telling her story, her son Arthur is trying to prove that his mother is senile and no longer able to take care of herself. Can Liam and Catherine prove that Karolina had children and if she did, are they still alive?

My initial reaction to this book is that the author immediately uses back story within the first couple of chapters. Using back story immediately is like walking a fine line. Sometimes it works and sometimes it does not work. In this case it works. Mr. Balson also moves between the present and the past, a tactic that, like using back story immediately, may or may not work. What I enjoyed about the book was the mystery and the final twist.

I recommend it.

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Filed under Book Review, Books, History

Where Is The Love?

In 2003, The Black Eyed Peas released Where Is The Love, a song questioning the treatment of our fellow human beings.

A few weeks ago, a new version of the song was released.

While many things have changed in 13 years, other things remain the same.

Enjoy the rest of your weekend.

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Filed under Music

Bridget Jones’s Baby Movie Review

Bridget Jones is the iconic single woman. She first appeared in 1995 in a newspaper column and then a book written by Helen Fielding. In 2001, movie audiences were introduced to the film version of Bridget in Bridget Jones’s Diary (2001).

Fifteen years later, Bridget (Renee Zellweger) has returned to the screen in Bridget Jones’s Baby. The film starts on the eve of Bridget’s 43rd birthday. Her friends have all abandoned the single life for the traditional life of marriage and children. Encouraged by a colleague to spend the weekend at a music festival, Bridget has a one night stand Jack (Patrick Dempsey), an American whose dating website has become very successful. A week later, she hooks up with her ex, Mark (Colin Firth) at the christening of a child of a mutual friend. Bridget soon finds herself pregnant, but the question is, who is the father?

In setting the film years after the last film ended, the production team seamlessly found a way to create a new narrative while keeping the narrative and the characters that drew audiences in from the beginning. Bridget is an every-woman, her life reflects the lives of many of the women in the audience. While our careers and our social lives are successful, there is a small part of us that yearns for a partner to share it with.

I recommend it.

Bridget Jones’s Baby is currently in theaters.

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Filed under Books, Jane Austen, Movie Review, Movies, Pride and Prejudice

Late Flashback Friday-North And South (2004)

The romance genre, depending on the reader and the writer can either be one of two things: predictable and boring or exciting and engaging. Elizabeth Gaskell’s classic novel, North and South, is the latter. Set in the fictional industrial town of Milton during the 19th century, it is the story of the rocky courtship between Margaret Hale and John Thornton.

In 2004, the book was made into a mini-series. Margaret Hale (Daniela Denby-Ashe) has spent her entire life in the South of England. When her father (Tim Pigott-Smith) looses his position with the church, he relocates his wife and daughter to Milton. To support his family, Mr. Hale finds work as a private tutor. One of his students of the mill owner John Thornton (Richard Armitage). Margaret believes John to be haughty and full of himself and sympathizes with the mill workers. John thinks Margaret is a snob and speaks of what she knows nothing about, especially the delicate balance between the workers and the owners that keep Milton going.

Among movies and miniseries in the BPD (British Period Drama) genre, this is one of the best. Based on a beloved classic with a cast of actors who have played roles in Downton Abbey, Jane Austen adaptations and other period dramas, it is worthy of the praise that had been heaped upon it. Add in the Lizzie and Darcy like chemistry between the two leads and you had the perfect BPD.

I recommend it.

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Filed under Books, Downton Abbey, Flashback Friday, History, Television, TV Review

Anne Of Green Gables Trailer

Has anyone else seen the new trailer for the new adaptation of Anne Of Green Gables?

Starring Martin Sheen and Sara Botsford as the supposedly curmudgeonly brother and sister duo Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert and Ella Ballentine as the title character, Anne Shirley is an orphaned girl adopted by Matthew and Marilla. They were expecting a boy to help them on the farm, what they got was a red-headed, uber imaginative, fast talking girl.

While the trailer is promising, only time will tell if this adaptation lives up to its predecessor.

My only wishes are that this new adaptation remains true to the books and Megan Follows has a cameo.

Have a nice weekend.

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September 23, 2016 · 11:22 pm

Flashback Friday-Great Expectations (2011)

Great Expectations is one of those books. If we did not read it at some point during our school days, we read it as adults. It’s no wonder that the book has been adapted for the screen many times over.

In 2011, Great Expectations was made into a TV movie starring Douglas Booth as Pip, the poor boy whose life is forever changed by a mysterious benefactor, Vanessa Kirby as Estella, the girl Pip has loved since boyhood and Gillian Anderson as Miss Havisham, Estella’s eccentric adopted mother.

As an adaptation, it’s not that bad. What I liked about this adaptation is that, like all good stories, there are certain narratives and experiences that are timeless. The book and this adaptation also reflect the changing world that the industrial revolution created.

I recommend it.

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Filed under Books, Flashback Friday, History, Movie Review, Television, TV Review

Throwback Thursday-Blank Check (1994)

The idea of a blank check is an interesting one. But it can also lead to a few problems.

In the 1994 movie, Blank Check, Preston Waters (Brian Bonsall) receives a most unexpected gift: a blank check. While it appears that the amount of money written on the check opens doors that only a 12-year-old can dream of, the money also draws the attention the gangsters who are looking for the money.

Let’s call this movie for what it is: a tween movie from the early 90’s. While there are some movies that transcend the era that they were made in, this film is stuck in 1994. Looking back as the target audience for the film at the time of its initial release, I remember it to be funny and mildly entertaining. But now as an adult, I can see the flaws in the film.

Do I recommend it? I will answer the question this way. If I was still 12, then yes I would recommend it. As a 30 something adult, I would not.

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Filed under Movie Review, Movies, Throwback Thursday