The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination Book Review

Over the centuries, women have been portrayed as many things: the innocent victim who is in need of rescue, the slut, the man-hater, the marriage-minded miss, etc. The problem with these images is that they are 2-D and without room to grow beyond the boxed-in perception. The only way to smash these stereotypes is to allow us to tell our own stories from our perspective.

The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination (published in 1979), this classic 1970’s second-wave nonfiction book examines how female characters are portrayed in 19th-century novels. Authors Susan Gubar and Sandra M. Gilbert compare the images of women created by male writers as opposed to the images created by female writers. Using the analogy of Bertha Mason (the literal madwoman in the attic) from the Charlotte Bronte novel, Jane Eyre, they dive into the fiction of authors such as Jane Austen, Emily Bronte, Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot, Mary Shelley, etc.

This book is a classic for a reason. Forty-plus years after its initial publication, it is as relevant today as it was back then. Their theory that women writers have a greater insight and ability to create 3D fully human characters as opposed to the typecast idea of females that some male writers have can still be seen today on both the page and the screen.

Do I recommend it? Absolutely.

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Miss Scarlet and the Duke Pilot Review

During the Victorian Era, women lived by a long list of rules.

The new Masterpiece/PBS series, Miss Scarlet and the Duke, premiered last night. Eliza Scarlet (Kate Phillips) was raised by her widower father, Henry (Kevin Doyle) in what was a unconventional manner for 1882 England. She believes that one day, she will take over the family business. But when he dies suddenly, and in debt, Eliza feels like she has no choice but to pick up where he left off.

But not everyone accepts the idea that Eliza can follow in her father’s footsteps. William Duke (Stuart Martin), her father’s protégé who is now a police detective is not sold on the idea. Following up on a promise he made to Henry years ago to protect Eliza, he tries to convince her to give up her detective work. But Eliza will not be swayed.

If I had to make a list today of the best new television shows of 2021, Miss Scarlet and the Duke would be near the top. Martin and Phillips have an undeniable Hepburn and Tracy like chemistry. I love how strong and single minded Eliza is, and how frustrating it is for William.

Do I recommend it? Absolutely.

Miss Scarlet and the Duke airs on PBS Sunday nights at 8PM.

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